Chev S-10 Ideas?

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Chev S-10 Ideas?

Roger Daisley
I just bought an '88 Chev S-10 that I intend to convert to electric. (Just
finished an '86 VW Cabriolet) My intention right now is to go DC flooded.

Before I start buying parts and cutting metal, I would appreciate any wisdom
from those that have passed before me ... Good things to do ... Bad things
not to do.

Thanks,
Roger Daisley
Pullman, WA
http://www.96-volt.com

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Re: Chev S-10 Ideas?

Rich Long-2
I converted a '94 S10.  Bob Batson at Electric Vehicles of America has a
nice S10 conversion design.  For instance his under the bed battery
arrangement worked well for me.

http://www.austinev.org/evalbum/1130

Rich


On Fri, 2007-11-16 at 20:12 -0800, Roger Daisley wrote:
> I just bought an '88 Chev S-10 that I intend to convert to electric. (Just
> finished an '86 VW Cabriolet) My intention right now is to go DC flooded.
>
> Before I start buying parts and cutting metal, I would appreciate any wisdom
> from those that have passed before me ... Good things to do ... Bad things
> not to do.


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Re: Chev S-10 Ideas?

Jim Coate-2
In reply to this post by Roger Daisley
If this hasn't been mentioned already, check out the S-10 offerings at
Canadian Electric Vehicles. In particular, he has a very nice motor
adapter and mounting system. The CanEV system retains the clutch, which
I think is an important feature.

See http://www.canev.com/KitsComp/Components/Adapter%20page.htm

The complete CanEV kit uses aluminum battery boxes that mount in the bed
which makes for an easier/quicker conversion; the EVA system puts the
batteries below the bed which is nicer but requires more work and custom
welding.

Good luck.

Roger Daisley wrote:
> I just bought an '88 Chev S-10 that I intend to convert to electric. (Just
> finished an '86 VW Cabriolet) My intention right now is to go DC flooded.
>
> Before I start buying parts and cutting metal, I would appreciate any wisdom
> from those that have passed before me ... Good things to do ... Bad things
> not to do.
>

--
Jim Coate, Spencertown, New York

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http://www.coate.org/contact_jim/
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1998 Electric S-10, 1997 Solectria Force, 1970's Elec-Traks
http://www.eeevee.com

The Electric Tractor Store is now open!
http://www.electrictractorstore.com

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Re: Chev S-10 Ideas?

Gerald Wagner
Roger, this is a plug for my book which is about converting the S-10
pickup.  Check my web site for details.  www.ev-convert.com

Jerry Wagner

On Nov 19, 2007 11:36 AM, Jim Coate <[hidden email]> wrote:

> If this hasn't been mentioned already, check out the S-10 offerings at
> Canadian Electric Vehicles. In particular, he has a very nice motor
> adapter and mounting system. The CanEV system retains the clutch, which
> I think is an important feature.
>
> See http://www.canev.com/KitsComp/Components/Adapter%20page.htm
>
> The complete CanEV kit uses aluminum battery boxes that mount in the bed
> which makes for an easier/quicker conversion; the EVA system puts the
> batteries below the bed which is nicer but requires more work and custom
> welding.
>
> Good luck.
>
> Roger Daisley wrote:
> > I just bought an '88 Chev S-10 that I intend to convert to electric.
> (Just
> > finished an '86 VW Cabriolet) My intention right now is to go DC
> flooded.
> >
> > Before I start buying parts and cutting metal, I would appreciate any
> wisdom
> > from those that have passed before me ... Good things to do ... Bad
> things
> > not to do.
> >
>
> --
> Jim Coate, Spencertown, New York
>
> = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
> NOTE: Mail sent to the "NO_REPLY" address will *not* reach me.
> To send me a private message, please follow the directions here:
> http://www.coate.org/contact_jim/
> = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
>
> 1998 Electric S-10, 1997 Solectria Force, 1970's Elec-Traks
> http://www.eeevee.com
>
> The Electric Tractor Store is now open!
> http://www.electrictractorstore.com
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
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Re: Chev S-10 Ideas?

Steve Kobb
In reply to this post by Roger Daisley
Roger --

I'm in the middle of converting a 2002 S-10, and -- so far -- I'm still smilin'.

Check it out:  http://www.evalbum.com/1280

Got most of the components from Bob Batson, and -- as you can see in one of the  pictures -- the batteries are going IN THE BED.

It's true that Bob recommends an under-the-bed solution, but that idea didn't really turn me on.

So... in the bed they go.

Steve Kobb
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Re: Chev S-10 Ideas?

Rush Dougherty
Steve wrote -

>
> Roger --
>
> I'm in the middle of converting a 2002 S-10, and -- so far -- I'm still
> smilin'.
>
> Check it out:  http://www.evalbum.com/1280
>
> Got most of the components from Bob Batson, and -- as you can see in one
> of
> the  pictures -- the batteries are going IN THE BED.
> Steve Kobb
> --


Hi Steve,

I'm doing an S-10 also and am wondering about your batteries and how you
figure your mileage.

Trojan says that the J185P, at the 20c rate is 195 AH. If you translate that
to the 1c rate (195 x .57), it is 111 AH. Since you have 13 batteries, or a
156 v pack, that means you'll have 17316 watts to 100% DOD. I've been
figuring my S-10 at 350 Whrs/mile and using my number you'll be able to go
49 miles at 100% DOD. If you use only 50% DOD, you'll have a 25 or so trip
between charges.

That's basically how I've figured my pack trip. How did you figure yours to
get a 40 mile trip on one charge or do you plan to really discharge your
pack?


Rush
Tucson, AZ
2000 Insight, 66.7lmpg, #4965
www.ironandwood.org
www.Airphibian.com
www.TEVA2.com

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Re: Chev S-10 Ideas?

Steve Kobb

Rush-5 wrote

Trojan says that the J185P, at the 20c rate is 195 AH. If you translate that
to the 1c rate (195 x .57), it is 111 AH. Since you have 13 batteries, or a
156 v pack, that means you'll have 17316 watts to 100% DOD. I've been
figuring my S-10 at 350 Whrs/mile and using my number you'll be able to go
49 miles at 100% DOD. If you use only 50% DOD, you'll have a 25 or so trip
between charges.
Rush --

You're quite right... and thank you for reminding me to change that on the evalbum page. I had put that 40-mile range goal up there some time ago -- and way before I settled on the vehicle and batteries that I eventually chose. My stated goal has now been ammended, along with the math that I used to derive it.

Of course, the REAL unknown is the denominator; i.e., what number to use for the watt-hours per mile. 350 may be the right number... or maybe it will be as low as 250.

Two items that argue in favor of a lower number: Nothing will be bleeding off horsepower from my ADC. Air conditioning and power steering will be energized from the low-voltage Optimas under the hood.

Also, Houston's horribly congested freeways often moves traffic along at 20 mph or less. Obviously, the current draw will be way less during those times.

Anyway, thanks again for your observation!

Steve
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Re: Chev S-10 Ideas?

EVDL Administrator
In reply to this post by Rush Dougherty
On 19 Nov 2007 at 18:47, Rush wrote:

> Trojan says that the J185P, at the 20c rate is 195 AH. If you translate that
> to the 1c rate (195 x .57), it is 111 AH. Since you have 13 batteries, or a
> 156 v pack, that means you'll have 17316 watts to 100% DOD.

I assume you mean 17316 Watt-HOURS.

David Roden - Akron, Ohio, USA
EVDL Administrator

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Re: Chev S-10 Ideas?

Rush Dougherty
David wrote -

> On 19 Nov 2007 at 18:47, Rush wrote:
>
>> Trojan says that the J185P, at the 20c rate is 195 AH. If you translate
>> that
>> to the 1c rate (195 x .57), it is 111 AH. Since you have 13 batteries, or
>> a
>> 156 v pack, that means you'll have 17316 watts to 100% DOD.
>
> I assume you mean 17316 Watt-HOURS.
>

No, I don't think so. What  I did was multiply the Volts * Amps which equals
watts, then divided by xxx watts/mile equals yyy miles

The wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watt says

Confusion of watts and watt-hours
Power and energy are frequently confused in the general media, for instance
when a device is said to be rated at "100 watts per hour", which does not
make any sense since a watt is a rate of doing work or using energy of 1
joule of energy per second. As a rate itself, a watt does not need to be
followed by a time designation, unless one is talking about a change in
power over time, analogous to an acceleration or deceleration.

Because a joule as a quantity of energy does not have a readily imagined
size to the layperson, the non-SI unit watt-hour, often in its multiples
such the kilowatt-hour or higher prefixes, is frequently used as a unit of
energy, especially by energy-supply companies (electricity and natural gas
suppliers) which often quote charges by the kilowatt-hour. A kilowatt-hour
is the amount of energy equivalent to a power of 1 kilowatt running for 1
hour.


Rush
Tucson, AZ
2000 Insight, 66.7lmpg, #4965
www.ironandwood.org
www.Airphibian.com
www.TEVA2.com

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Re: Chev S-10 Ideas?

Rush Dougherty
In reply to this post by EVDL Administrator






David wrote -

> On 19 Nov 2007 at 18:47, Rush wrote:
>
>> Trojan says that the J185P, at the 20c rate is 195 AH. If you translate
>> that
>> to the 1c rate (195 x .57), it is 111 AH. Since you have 13 batteries, or
>> a
>> 156 v pack, that means you'll have 17316 watts to 100% DOD.
>
> I assume you mean 17316 Watt-HOURS.
>
>
David,

looking over what I did, I guess you're right, I did multiply 111AH x 156V,
so it is 17316 Watt-Hours.

Rush
Tucson, AZ
2000 Insight, 66.7lmpg, #4965
www.ironandwood.org
www.Airphibian.com
www.TEVA2.com

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Re: Chev S-10 Ideas?

Zeke Yewdall
In reply to this post by Rush Dougherty
On Nov 20, 2007 7:03 PM, Rush <[hidden email]> wrote:

> David wrote -
>
> > On 19 Nov 2007 at 18:47, Rush wrote:
> >
> >> Trojan says that the J185P, at the 20c rate is 195 AH. If you translate
> >> that
> >> to the 1c rate (195 x .57), it is 111 AH. Since you have 13 batteries, or
> >> a
> >> 156 v pack, that means you'll have 17316 watts to 100% DOD.
> >
> > I assume you mean 17316 Watt-HOURS.
> >
>
> No, I don't think so. What  I did was multiply the Volts * Amps which equals
> watts, then divided by xxx watts/mile equals yyy miles

Actually you did.  You multiplied volts by amp-hours.... and then
divided by watt-hours per mile to get miles....

If you think about it, watt hours is a measure of energy stored in the
batteries.  Watts is a measure of how much instantaneous power the
batteries can give (and 17.3kW is only about 23 horsepower... which
doesn't make alot of sense).

Z

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