DC/DC 288v to 12v

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DC/DC 288v to 12v

Jeff Shanab
That is my exact setup. I have left it connected since I installed it
even trhu an equalization cycle to 390V (oops)(remember 24 AGMs to 14.77
is 354V)
It does sag more than I would like when I get everything going, I need
to wire the boost plug to the ignition relay.
This is a nice dc-dc, it goes to sleep basically when the battery is
charged (I do have an aux battery) and the fan slows or stops.

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Re: DC/DC 288v to 12v

John Mogelnicki
Jeff,
How is it wired?
The 220volt AC line has 4 wires, 2 "hot", 1 neutral, 1 ground.
I assume you feed the 288v DC Positive to one (or both?) of the Hot inputs,
and the negative 288v to the neutral line (and ground? since in a house they
are the same).
Thanks,
John

On Dec 24, 2007 11:25 PM, Jeff Shanab <[hidden email]> wrote:

> That is my exact setup. I have left it connected since I installed it
> even trhu an equalization cycle to 390V (oops)(remember 24 AGMs to 14.77
> is 354V)
> It does sag more than I would like when I get everything going, I need
> to wire the boost plug to the ignition relay.
> This is a nice dc-dc, it goes to sleep basically when the battery is
> charged (I do have an aux battery) and the fan slows or stops.
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
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Re: DC/DC 288v to 12v

Jeff Shanab
In reply to this post by Jeff Shanab
IOTA dc wiring

 It has a standard 3 wire plug on it, like a PC power supply. Pack plus
went to one of the wires(white or blue) and pack - to the other(black or
brown). I left the ground(green) disconnected as I didn't want to
reference the pack to the body.

Typical 220 house wiring has 4 wires
    2 out of phase power wires it is 220 between them.
    1 neutral that you could use with 1 of the above power wires if you
only wanted 110V
    and a ground which, to be honest, is connected to the exact same
spot in the power panel as the neutral (unless it is GFI)

Your whole house is wired this way, half the 110 circuits are on one
side and 1/2 are on the other side of the incoming 220
(which has 3 wires, 2 hots and a neutral, the 4th ground wire is added
at the panel and connected to earth along with the incoming neutral.
lottsa redundancy)
I have taken 2 110V extension cords wired into a 220 plug when I needed
temporary 220. I was working on a house and had a 220 table saw. a
little trial and error to find to 110V circuits not on the same side.


This just gave me an idea. It would be easy for me to change a circuit
in my hose to 220 at the panel and change the plugs doubling the output
to the charger for a plug without re-wiring. (I bought a new house and
they really skimped on the 110V wiring. I wasn't watching close enough,
all #14 for the 110v circuits and way to many things per circuit.)

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Re: DC/DC 288v to 12v

(-Phil-)
In reply to this post by John Mogelnicki
The Neutral is not used in the normal application.  You connect traction (-)
and (+) to the line inputs, polarity is not a concern.  AC ground is
connected to the cars chassis ground and the converters.

-Phil
http://evalbum.com/1413

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Mogelnicki" <[hidden email]>
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, December 25, 2007 3:58 AM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] DC/DC 288v to 12v


> Jeff,
> How is it wired?
> The 220volt AC line has 4 wires, 2 "hot", 1 neutral, 1 ground.
> I assume you feed the 288v DC Positive to one (or both?) of the Hot
> inputs,
> and the negative 288v to the neutral line (and ground? since in a house
> they
> are the same).
> Thanks,
> John
>
> On Dec 24, 2007 11:25 PM, Jeff Shanab <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> That is my exact setup. I have left it connected since I installed it
>> even trhu an equalization cycle to 390V (oops)(remember 24 AGMs to 14.77
>> is 354V)
>> It does sag more than I would like when I get everything going, I need
>> to wire the boost plug to the ignition relay.
>> This is a nice dc-dc, it goes to sleep basically when the battery is
>> charged (I do have an aux battery) and the fan slows or stops.
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> For subscription options, see
>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>

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Re: DC/DC 288v to 12v

Rick Beebe
In reply to this post by Jeff Shanab
Jeff Shanab wrote:
> This just gave me an idea. It would be easy for me to change a circuit
> in my hose to 220 at the panel and change the plugs doubling the output
> to the charger for a plug without re-wiring. (I bought a new house and
> they really skimped on the 110V wiring. I wasn't watching close enough,
> all #14 for the 110v circuits and way to many things per circuit.)

#14 is fine for 110v 15amp circuits, which are the norm for lighting and
room outlets. Any 20amp circuits (most kitchen) had better be #12 or
you're in code violation.

You can easily up the voltage (assuming you have a free breaker slot in
the panel) but make sure it's a dedicated circuit. You really don't want
220 coming out of the outlets in your living room. <g>

--Rick

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Re: DC/DC 288v to 12v

Zeke Yewdall
On Dec 25, 2007 11:20 AM, Rick Beebe <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> You can easily up the voltage (assuming you have a free breaker slot in
> the panel) but make sure it's a dedicated circuit. You really don't want
> 220 coming out of the outlets in your living room. <g>
>
> --Rick
>
>

You could put in a 20 amp 240volt outlet for the car -- that way there
isn't the possibility of accidentally plugging in a 115vac appliance.
Also, to better meet code (and to prevent confusion 10 years from now
when someone is trying to figure out what the heck you did, you should
mark the white wire with red tap on both ends, to indicate that it's
no longer a grounded wire.

Z

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Re: DC/DC 288v to 12v

Rick Beebe
Zeke Yewdall wrote:
> On Dec 25, 2007 11:20 AM, Rick Beebe <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> You can easily up the voltage (assuming you have a free breaker slot in
>> the panel) but make sure it's a dedicated circuit. You really don't want
>> 220 coming out of the outlets in your living room. <g>
>
> You could put in a 20 amp 240volt outlet for the car -- that way there
> isn't the possibility of accidentally plugging in a 115vac appliance.

He absolutely should, but many circuits daisy-chain through multiple
outlets. My point was to make sure the outlet in the garage was the only
one on the circuit. Or that ALL get a 240 volt outlet.

> Also, to better meet code (and to prevent confusion 10 years from now
> when someone is trying to figure out what the heck you did, you should
> mark the white wire with red tap on both ends, to indicate that it's
> no longer a grounded wire.

Agreed.

--Rick

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Re: DC/DC 288v to 12v

EVDL Administrator
In reply to this post by Zeke Yewdall
On 25 Dec 2007 at 11:29, Zeke Yewdall wrote:

> > You can easily up the voltage (assuming you have a free breaker slot in the
> > panel) but make sure it's a dedicated circuit. You really don't want 220
> > coming out of the outlets in your living room. <g>
>
> You could put in a 20 amp 240volt outlet for the car -- that way there
> isn't the possibility of accidentally plugging in a 115vac appliance.

This is what you'd need to comply with the electrical code.  It's a matter
of common sense anyway; having 240 volts connected to a 120 volt receptacle
is just asking for trouble.

David Roden - Akron, Ohio, USA
EVDL Administrator

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Re: DC/DC 288v to 12v

Jeff Shanab
In reply to this post by Jeff Shanab
I don't think we should ground the pack side of the dc-dc, the case and
the Low voltage side is grounded.
If we ground the HV side, haven't we just tied the pack to ground? (thru
the rectifier of the iota)

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