EVLN: GM's Multiple-Magnet-Length Electric-Motor Patent

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EVLN: GM's Multiple-Magnet-Length Electric-Motor Patent

Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list


http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2018/01/gm-patents-an-electric-motor-with-multiple-magnet-lengths.html
GM Patents an Electric Motor With Multiple Magnet Lengths
Jan 04, 2018  Michael Accardi

[images  
http://www.autoguide.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/chevrolet-bolt-powertrain.jpg

http://www.autoguide.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/magnet-length-tabs-679x445.png
magnet length tabs

http://www.autoguide.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/magnets-2.png
 
http://www.autoguide.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/magnets-3.png
magnets
]

Anyone who thinks General Motors isn’t serious about electric vehicle
leadership doesn’t have a clue.

Despite Silicon Valley’s derogatory ideology regarding conventional car
companies like General Motors, the dinosaur from Detroit has been at the
forefront of electrifying personal mobility. GM’s flirtation with electric
vehicles began in earnest back the early ’60s. It started with the
Electro-Vair and Electro-Maro programs in the ’60s, then came a
battery-powered Chevette in 1977, followed by production of the EV1 in the
late ’90s, before culminating with the Chevrolet Bolt, the industry’s first
long-range-yet-affordable-mainstream-electric-car.

But the company isn’t resting on its laurels, as Tesla Model 3 reviews begin
to hit the internet, GM is busy working on a new family of electric cars due
in 2021. While advancements in battery technology have long been heralded as
the key to consumer adoption, GM engineers haven’t forgotten that a motor is
still what propels a vehicle forward, electric or not.

Published on December 19, 2017, by the USPTO, GM has filed a patent for an
electric motor with multiple magnet lengths which could totally change how
the company thinks about manufacturing electric propulsion systems.

For example, the Chevrolet Bolt uses a permanent magnet brushless motor,
where a magnetic field is produced by the spinning magnet and rotor assembly
which then transfers to the stator core and interacts with flowing current
to create torque. Differing magnet lengths will change the torque output,
smaller magnets decrease torque, while longer ones increase torque,
proportionally.

What the company is proposing is a new “modular” lamination sheet which
would be capable of accepting multiple magnet lengths. Instead of being
forced to re-engineer the lamination stack each time a change in magnet
length is required, GM proposes a series of tabs within the apertures of the
lamination sheets which, when layered, can be assembled to delineate the
magnet slots.

Effectively, the tabs will allow the stacks to accept either short or long
magnets–the tab will support the shorter magnet halfway down the aperture or
get pushed out of the way upon inserting a longer magnet. GM claims there
will be at least a 25-percent difference in magnet lengths.

It’s helpful to think about GM’s work with modular lamination stacks almost
like powertrain sharing–take GM’s naturally-aspirated 6.2-liter small-block
V8, which is offered in LT1 and L86 guise. As the high-performance version,
the LT1 is equipped with a shorter intake runner for better high-rpm
breathing, different exhaust manifolds, and unique cam timing; while the
trucks make use of longer intake runners in order to fatten up the mid-range
torque curve.

What will be of interest moving forward is how GM plans to implement the
respective magnet lengths, will the smaller magnets be used for efficiency,
while the bigger ones left for high-performance or hauling? Possibly, but
there are also drawbacks to simply increasing magnet size; larger magnets
may create more torque, but they also force the coil to fight through more
resistance as the higher torque values lead to an increase in eddy and
hysteresis.
[© 2018 VerticalScope]
...
http://www.gminsidenews.com/articles/gm-patents-an-electric-motor-with-multiple-magnet-lengths/
GM Patents an Electric Motor With Multiple Magnet Lengths
January 3, 2018


+
http://wardsauto.com/engines/morgan-enlists-help-sporty-electric-vehicle
Morgan Enlists Help With Sporty Electric Vehicle
Dec 28, 2017  Morgan announces a technical partnership with Frazer-Nash
Energy Systems to help with production of its all-electric retro-styled
3-wheeled sports car. The Morgan EV3 is slated for production in 2018 and
management is hoping the partnership will give the car improved performance
with rapid charging technology, proven ...

https://www.motor1.com/news/225676/dyson-production-model-rendering/
2020 Dyson Production Model Imagined As Electric Sports Car
Dec 29, 2017 - The EV will use solid state batteries. It's not a secret that
vacuum maker Dyson plans to launch a fully electric vehicle on the market
before the end of the decade ... Sir James Dyson ... will invest no less
than £2 billion (almost $2.7B) into the ...
https://icdn-3.motor1.com/images/mgl/3xWWx/s4/dyson-electric-vehicle-rendering.jpg




For EVLN EV-newswire posts use:
 http://evdl.org/archive/


{brucedp.neocities.org}

--
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Re: EVLN: GM's Multiple-Magnet-Length Electric-Motor Patent

Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
I do not see the advantage except having the capability to use one motor core for multiply HP motors.  Does anyone think GM is going to use different magnet lengths in the same motor?  Does this have some efficiency improvement?  Do you think they are going modify the controller to allow different magnet lengths in the same motor?  Anyone have any thoughts on this subject?


________________________________
From: EV <[hidden email]> on behalf of brucedp5 via EV <[hidden email]>
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 2:43 PM
To: [hidden email]
Cc: brucedp5
Subject: [EVDL] EVLN: GM's Multiple-Magnet-Length Electric-Motor Patent

Anyone who thinks General Motors isn’t serious about electric vehicle
leadership doesn’t have a clue.

Despite Silicon Valley’s derogatory ideology regarding conventional car
companies like General Motors, the dinosaur from Detroit has been at the
forefront of electrifying personal mobility. GM’s flirtation with electric
vehicles began in earnest back the early ’60s. It started with the
Electro-Vair and Electro-Maro programs in the ’60s, then came a
battery-powered Chevette in 1977, followed by production of the EV1 in the
late ’90s, before culminating with the Chevrolet Bolt, the industry’s first
long-range-yet-affordable-mainstream-electric-car.

But the company isn’t resting on its laurels, as Tesla Model 3 reviews begin
to hit the internet, GM is busy working on a new family of electric cars due
in 2021. While advancements in battery technology have long been heralded as
the key to consumer adoption, GM engineers haven’t forgotten that a motor is
still what propels a vehicle forward, electric or not.

Published on December 19, 2017, by the USPTO, GM has filed a patent for an
electric motor with multiple magnet lengths which could totally change how
the company thinks about manufacturing electric propulsion systems.

For example, the Chevrolet Bolt uses a permanent magnet brushless motor,
where a magnetic field is produced by the spinning magnet and rotor assembly
which then transfers to the stator core and interacts with flowing current
to create torque. Differing magnet lengths will change the torque output,
smaller magnets decrease torque, while longer ones increase torque,
proportionally.

What the company is proposing is a new “modular” lamination sheet which
would be capable of accepting multiple magnet lengths. Instead of being
forced to re-engineer the lamination stack each time a change in magnet
length is required, GM proposes a series of tabs within the apertures of the
lamination sheets which, when layered, can be assembled to delineate the
magnet slots.

Effectively, the tabs will allow the stacks to accept either short or long
magnets–the tab will support the shorter magnet halfway down the aperture or
get pushed out of the way upon inserting a longer magnet. GM claims there
will be at least a 25-percent difference in magnet lengths.

It’s helpful to think about GM’s work with modular lamination stacks almost
like powertrain sharing–take GM’s naturally-aspirated 6.2-liter small-block
V8, which is offered in LT1 and L86 guise. As the high-performance version,
the LT1 is equipped with a shorter intake runner for better high-rpm
breathing, different exhaust manifolds, and unique cam timing; while the
trucks make use of longer intake runners in order to fatten up the mid-range
torque curve.

What will be of interest moving forward is how GM plans to implement the
respective magnet lengths, will the smaller magnets be used for efficiency,
while the bigger ones left for high-performance or hauling? Possibly, but
there are also drawbacks to simply increasing magnet size; larger magnets
may create more torque, but they also force the coil to fight through more
resistance as the higher torque values lead to an increase in eddy and
hysteresis.
UNSUBSCRIBE: http://www.evdl.org/help/index.html#usub

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Re: EVLN: GM's Multiple-Magnet-Length Electric-Motor Patent

Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
Interesting from a production point of view.  If they have a need for low quantities (relative) of motors with different HP then it might make sense to tools once and then be able to vary the characteristics during assembly.  I was thinking it might be more interesting if they put the rotor on a lead screw and allowed the positioning of the magnets w.r.t. the coils to be adjusted.  Would provide something like field weakening on a permanent magnet motor.

Regards,
Lawrence Harris
[hidden email]




> On Jan 4, 2018, at 15:09, ROBERT via EV <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I do not see the advantage except having the capability to use one motor core for multiply HP motors.  Does anyone think GM is going to use different magnet lengths in the same motor?  Does this have some efficiency improvement?  Do you think they are going modify the controller to allow different magnet lengths in the same motor?  Anyone have any thoughts on this subject?
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: EV <[hidden email]> on behalf of brucedp5 via EV <[hidden email]>
> Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 2:43 PM
> To: [hidden email]
> Cc: brucedp5
> Subject: [EVDL] EVLN: GM's Multiple-Magnet-Length Electric-Motor Patent
>
> Anyone who thinks General Motors isn’t serious about electric vehicle
> leadership doesn’t have a clue.
>
> Despite Silicon Valley’s derogatory ideology regarding conventional car
> companies like General Motors, the dinosaur from Detroit has been at the
> forefront of electrifying personal mobility. GM’s flirtation with electric
> vehicles began in earnest back the early ’60s. It started with the
> Electro-Vair and Electro-Maro programs in the ’60s, then came a
> battery-powered Chevette in 1977, followed by production of the EV1 in the
> late ’90s, before culminating with the Chevrolet Bolt, the industry’s first
> long-range-yet-affordable-mainstream-electric-car.
>
> But the company isn’t resting on its laurels, as Tesla Model 3 reviews begin
> to hit the internet, GM is busy working on a new family of electric cars due
> in 2021. While advancements in battery technology have long been heralded as
> the key to consumer adoption, GM engineers haven’t forgotten that a motor is
> still what propels a vehicle forward, electric or not.
>
> Published on December 19, 2017, by the USPTO, GM has filed a patent for an
> electric motor with multiple magnet lengths which could totally change how
> the company thinks about manufacturing electric propulsion systems.
>
> For example, the Chevrolet Bolt uses a permanent magnet brushless motor,
> where a magnetic field is produced by the spinning magnet and rotor assembly
> which then transfers to the stator core and interacts with flowing current
> to create torque. Differing magnet lengths will change the torque output,
> smaller magnets decrease torque, while longer ones increase torque,
> proportionally.
>
> What the company is proposing is a new “modular” lamination sheet which
> would be capable of accepting multiple magnet lengths. Instead of being
> forced to re-engineer the lamination stack each time a change in magnet
> length is required, GM proposes a series of tabs within the apertures of the
> lamination sheets which, when layered, can be assembled to delineate the
> magnet slots.
>
> Effectively, the tabs will allow the stacks to accept either short or long
> magnets–the tab will support the shorter magnet halfway down the aperture or
> get pushed out of the way upon inserting a longer magnet. GM claims there
> will be at least a 25-percent difference in magnet lengths.
>
> It’s helpful to think about GM’s work with modular lamination stacks almost
> like powertrain sharing–take GM’s naturally-aspirated 6.2-liter small-block
> V8, which is offered in LT1 and L86 guise. As the high-performance version,
> the LT1 is equipped with a shorter intake runner for better high-rpm
> breathing, different exhaust manifolds, and unique cam timing; while the
> trucks make use of longer intake runners in order to fatten up the mid-range
> torque curve.
>
> What will be of interest moving forward is how GM plans to implement the
> respective magnet lengths, will the smaller magnets be used for efficiency,
> while the bigger ones left for high-performance or hauling? Possibly, but
> there are also drawbacks to simply increasing magnet size; larger magnets
> may create more torque, but they also force the coil to fight through more
> resistance as the higher torque values lead to an increase in eddy and
> hysteresis.
> UNSUBSCRIBE: http://www.evdl.org/help/index.html#usub
>
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> Please discuss EV drag racing at NEDRA (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NEDRA)
>

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Re: EVLN: GM's Multiple-Magnet-Length Electric-Motor Patent

Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
Is it possible to use different magnet lengths in the same motor?


________________________________
From: Lawrence Harris <[hidden email]>
Sent: Friday, January 5, 2018 12:27 AM
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List
Cc: ROBERT
Subject: Re: [EVDL] EVLN: GM's Multiple-Magnet-Length Electric-Motor Patent

Interesting from a production point of view.  If they have a need for low quantities (relative) of motors with different HP then it might make sense to tools once and then be able to vary the characteristics during assembly.  I was thinking it might be more interesting if they put the rotor on a lead screw and allowed the positioning of the magnets w.r.t. the coils to be adjusted.  Would provide something like field weakening on a permanent magnet motor.

Regards,
Lawrence Harris
[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>




On Jan 4, 2018, at 15:09, ROBERT via EV <[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:

I do not see the advantage except having the capability to use one motor core for multiply HP motors.  Does anyone think GM is going to use different magnet lengths in the same motor?  Does this have some efficiency improvement?  Do you think they are going modify the controller to allow different magnet lengths in the same motor?  Anyone have any thoughts on this subject?


________________________________
From: EV <[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>> on behalf of brucedp5 via EV <[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>>
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 2:43 PM
To: [hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>
Cc: brucedp5
Subject: [EVDL] EVLN: GM's Multiple-Magnet-Length Electric-Motor Patent

Anyone who thinks General Motors isn’t serious about electric vehicle
leadership doesn’t have a clue.

Despite Silicon Valley’s derogatory ideology regarding conventional car
companies like General Motors, the dinosaur from Detroit has been at the
forefront of electrifying personal mobility. GM’s flirtation with electric
vehicles began in earnest back the early ’60s. It started with the
Electro-Vair and Electro-Maro programs in the ’60s, then came a
battery-powered Chevette in 1977, followed by production of the EV1 in the
late ’90s, before culminating with the Chevrolet Bolt, the industry’s first
long-range-yet-affordable-mainstream-electric-car.

But the company isn’t resting on its laurels, as Tesla Model 3 reviews begin
to hit the internet, GM is busy working on a new family of electric cars due
in 2021. While advancements in battery technology have long been heralded as
the key to consumer adoption, GM engineers haven’t forgotten that a motor is
still what propels a vehicle forward, electric or not.

Published on December 19, 2017, by the USPTO, GM has filed a patent for an
electric motor with multiple magnet lengths which could totally change how
the company thinks about manufacturing electric propulsion systems.

For example, the Chevrolet Bolt uses a permanent magnet brushless motor,
where a magnetic field is produced by the spinning magnet and rotor assembly
which then transfers to the stator core and interacts with flowing current
to create torque. Differing magnet lengths will change the torque output,
smaller magnets decrease torque, while longer ones increase torque,
proportionally.

What the company is proposing is a new “modular” lamination sheet which
would be capable of accepting multiple magnet lengths. Instead of being
forced to re-engineer the lamination stack each time a change in magnet
length is required, GM proposes a series of tabs within the apertures of the
lamination sheets which, when layered, can be assembled to delineate the
magnet slots.

Effectively, the tabs will allow the stacks to accept either short or long
magnets–the tab will support the shorter magnet halfway down the aperture or
get pushed out of the way upon inserting a longer magnet. GM claims there
will be at least a 25-percent difference in magnet lengths.

It’s helpful to think about GM’s work with modular lamination stacks almost
like powertrain sharing–take GM’s naturally-aspirated 6.2-liter small-block
V8, which is offered in LT1 and L86 guise. As the high-performance version,
the LT1 is equipped with a shorter intake runner for better high-rpm
breathing, different exhaust manifolds, and unique cam timing; while the
trucks make use of longer intake runners in order to fatten up the mid-range
torque curve.

What will be of interest moving forward is how GM plans to implement the
respective magnet lengths, will the smaller magnets be used for efficiency,
while the bigger ones left for high-performance or hauling? Possibly, but
there are also drawbacks to simply increasing magnet size; larger magnets
may create more torque, but they also force the coil to fight through more
resistance as the higher torque values lead to an increase in eddy and
hysteresis.
UNSUBSCRIBE: http://www.evdl.org/help/index.html#usub

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Re: EVLN: GM's Multiple-Magnet-Length Electric-Motor Patent

Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
ROBERT via EV wrote:
> Is it possible to use different magnet lengths in the same motor?

It's possible, but wouldn't make much sense. It would take a pretty
specialized application to require it. Try to imagine making an ICE with
different size pistons for each cylinder.

It should be noted that electric motors have been around for 150+ years,
and diligently worked on my some of the most brilliant minds in
engineering. It's mighty hard to come up with anything that hasn't
already been tried before. Most "breakthroughs" (like this one from GM)
are just re-discoveries of old ideas, or minor enhancement to slightly
improve cost or efficiency.

--
Whether we or our politicians know it or not, Nature is party to all
our deals and decisions, and she has more votes, a longer memory,
and a sterner sense of justice than we do. -- Wendell Berry
--
Lee Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, www.sunrise-ev.com
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Re: EVLN: GM's Multiple-Magnet-Length Electric-Motor Patent

Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
In reply to this post by Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
Lawrence Harris via EV wrote:
> I was thinking it might be more interesting if they put the rotor on
> a lead screw and allowed the positioning of the magnets w.r.t. the
> coils to be adjusted.  Would provide something like field weakening
> on a permanent magnet motor.

There is a style of induction motor that does this. A classic
single-phase induction motor requires a trade-off in rotor resistance.
You can design the rotor for high starting torque, or high running
torque; but not both.

So they made one with two rotors. One optimized for high starting
torque, the other for high running torque. They are mounted on the same
shaft, end-to-end. There is a spring that pushes the high-torque rotor
into the stator when the motor is off. When you power the motor, the
high-torque rotor provides the torque needed to start the load. But
then, the stator's magnetic field acts like a solenoid, to compress the
spring and pull the high-efficiency rotor into the stator. This type of
motor got used in millions of home appliances.
--
Whether we or our politicians know it or not, Nature is party to all
our deals and decisions, and she has more votes, a longer memory,
and a sterner sense of justice than we do. -- Wendell Berry
--
Lee Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, www.sunrise-ev.com
_______________________________________________
UNSUBSCRIBE: http://www.evdl.org/help/index.html#usub
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