EVLN: HELLA Developing New Inductive EVSE

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EVLN: HELLA Developing New Inductive EVSE

brucedp5


http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwgeeks/article/HELLA-Developing-New-Charging-Systems-For-Electric-Vehicles-2014042299
HELLA Developing New Charging Systems For Electric Vehicles
April 22 2014  HELLA

PLYMOUTH, Mich., April 22, 2014 /PRNewswire/  HELLA is working with Paul Vahle GmbH to develop wireless charging systems that could spark renewed consumer interest in electric and hybrid-electric vehicles.

Commonly used to recharge small consumer products such as smartphones and electric toothbrushes, inductive or wireless charging for cars will make it easier for drivers to charge car batteries and extend a vehicle's driving range.

Rather than using plug-in charging stations, car owners in the future will simply need to park over an inductive charging unit to trigger the process, according to Dr. Marc Rosenmayr, CEO for HELLA Electronics in North and South America.

He adds that if inductive charging coils were embedded in streets, electric vehicles also could be recharged when stopped at traffic lights or even while being driven.

For electric car buyers, a contact-free method of transferring energy to the vehicle certainly will be more convenient and less time consuming. Cables no longer will be necessary. Inclement weather and the risk of vandalism also can be avoided if outside charging stations are involved.

"Wireless, inductive charging is a far more convenient way to recharge a vehicle's battery system," Rosenmayr points out. "The driver only needs to stop or drive over a charging unit or network to activate the process. As wireless charging has become more available and easy to use, it also might allow automakers to reduce battery size and weight on electric and hybrid electric vehicles.

Rosenmayr notes that a number of technological and infrastructure challenges still must be overcome before wireless charging for cars and light trucks can be successfully introduced. Energy transfer over high-frequency fields that are at the heart of inductive systems, for example, cause heat to build up in metal objects which could lead to safety issues. The impact that wireless charging might have on other vehicle electronic systems such as navigation, infotainment, driver-assistance and keyless entry systems also will need to be studied.

The cooperation between Vahle and HELLA combines the expertise and experience of both companies in the field inductive charging. Based in Kamen, Germany, Vahle has 15 years of experience in contact-free energy transfer in industrial environments, while HELLA is a recognized leader in the development of electronics, software, processes and production in the auto industry.
[© 2014 Copyright Wisdom Digital Media]



http://evfleetworld.co.uk/news/2014/Apr/Hella-and-Vahle-partner-on-wireless-electric-vehicle-charging/0438014059
Hella and Vahle partner on wireless electric vehicle charging
22 Apr 2014 - Hella and Vahle will partner to develop wireless charging systems for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles Hella and Vahle will partner to develop wireless charging systems for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles
Component manufacturer Hella and contact-free energy transfer specialist Paul Vahle GmbH have announced a partnership to develop wireless charging systems for plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles.
[image  
http://evfleetworld.co.uk/news/2014/Apr/images/0438014059-9003-77181_jpg-320.jpg
Hella and Vahle will partner to develop wireless charging systems for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles
] ...




For all EVLN posts use:
http://electric-vehicle-discussion-list.413529.n4.nabble.com/template/NamlServlet.jtp?macro=search_page&node=413529&query=evln&sort=date
+
EVLN: First Impression of Daimler’s 190 Mile DENZA EV


{brucedp.150m.com}
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Re: EVLN: HELLA Developing New Inductive EVSE

EV professor
Again with the wireless charging, show me a product I can buy today and is
more efficient than a simple plug and wire.  A lot of talk and pictures of
simulated dream products. The problems with direct wired charging are
slight lack of convenience, but, I don't see any new technology for
refueling with gasoline without stopping. And what is the transfer
efficiency and what health hazards are the possible result of flinging
kilowatts of energy into an area which may or may not be occupied by an EV
and what happens when some misguided driver parks with his ICE fuel tank
directly over a wireless recharging emitter. And a cord can give us Quick
charging , is the wireless Quick charging?  Or are we going to invest more
thousands in infrastructure in the name of convenience similar to the B.S.
of the J1772 "Standard" trying to generate profits for infrastructure
manufacturers or sales companies.  The only improvements necessary are
lower cost and greater efficiencies, and thus greater range in the
vehicles...

*Dennis Lee Miles *

*Director   **E.V.T.I. Inc.*

*E-Mail:*  *[hidden email]* <[hidden email]>

   *Phone #* *(863) 944-9913*

Dade City, Florida 33523

 USA




On Sun, Apr 27, 2014 at 8:16 AM, brucedp5 <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>
>
> http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwgeeks/article/HELLA-Developing-New-Charging-Systems-For-Electric-Vehicles-2014042299
> HELLA Developing New Charging Systems For Electric Vehicles
> April 22 2014  HELLA
>
> PLYMOUTH, Mich., April 22, 2014 /PRNewswire/  HELLA is working with Paul
> Vahle GmbH to develop wireless charging systems that could spark renewed
> consumer interest in electric and hybrid-electric vehicles.
>
> Commonly used to recharge small consumer products such as smartphones and
> electric toothbrushes, inductive or wireless charging for cars will make it
> easier for drivers to charge car batteries and extend a vehicle's driving
> range.
>
> Rather than using plug-in charging stations, car owners in the future will
> simply need to park over an inductive charging unit to trigger the process,
> according to Dr. Marc Rosenmayr, CEO for HELLA Electronics in North and
> South America.
>
> He adds that if inductive charging coils were embedded in streets, electric
> vehicles also could be recharged when stopped at traffic lights or even
> while being driven.
>
> For electric car buyers, a contact-free method of transferring energy to
> the
> vehicle certainly will be more convenient and less time consuming. Cables
> no
> longer will be necessary. Inclement weather and the risk of vandalism also
> can be avoided if outside charging stations are involved.
>
> "Wireless, inductive charging is a far more convenient way to recharge a
> vehicle's battery system," Rosenmayr points out. "The driver only needs to
> stop or drive over a charging unit or network to activate the process. As
> wireless charging has become more available and easy to use, it also might
> allow automakers to reduce battery size and weight on electric and hybrid
> electric vehicles.
>
> Rosenmayr notes that a number of technological and infrastructure
> challenges
> still must be overcome before wireless charging for cars and light trucks
> can be successfully introduced. Energy transfer over high-frequency fields
> that are at the heart of inductive systems, for example, cause heat to
> build
> up in metal objects which could lead to safety issues. The impact that
> wireless charging might have on other vehicle electronic systems such as
> navigation, infotainment, driver-assistance and keyless entry systems also
> will need to be studied.
>
> The cooperation between Vahle and HELLA combines the expertise and
> experience of both companies in the field inductive charging. Based in
> Kamen, Germany, Vahle has 15 years of experience in contact-free energy
> transfer in industrial environments, while HELLA is a recognized leader in
> the development of electronics, software, processes and production in the
> auto industry.
> [(c) 2014 Copyright Wisdom Digital Media]
>
>
>
>
> http://evfleetworld.co.uk/news/2014/Apr/Hella-and-Vahle-partner-on-wireless-electric-vehicle-charging/0438014059
> Hella and Vahle partner on wireless electric vehicle charging
> 22 Apr 2014 - Hella and Vahle will partner to develop wireless charging
> systems for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles Hella and Vahle will
> partner to develop wireless charging systems for electric and plug-in
> hybrid
> vehicles
> Component manufacturer Hella and contact-free energy transfer specialist
> Paul Vahle GmbH have announced a partnership to develop wireless charging
> systems for plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles.
> [image
>
> http://evfleetworld.co.uk/news/2014/Apr/images/0438014059-9003-77181_jpg-320.jpg
> Hella and Vahle will partner to develop wireless charging systems for
> electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles
> ] ...
>
>
>
>
> For all EVLN posts use:
>
> http://electric-vehicle-discussion-list.413529.n4.nabble.com/template/NamlServlet.jtp?macro=search_page&node=413529&query=evln&sort=date
> +
> EVLN: First Impression of Daimler's 190 Mile DENZA EV
>
>
> {brucedp.150m.com}
>
>
>
> --
> View this message in context:
> http://electric-vehicle-discussion-list.413529.n4.nabble.com/EVLN-HELLA-Developing-New-Inductive-EVSE-tp4669218.html
> Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at
> Nabble.com.
> _______________________________________________
> UNSUBSCRIBE: http://www.evdl.org/help/index.html#usub
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> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NEDRA)
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Re: EVLN: HELLA Developing New Inductive EVSE

Martin WINLOW
Hi Dennis,

So, I'm getting the tiniest feeling you don't think much of inductive charging (IC)?

Whilst I agree that it's all vapourware at the moment you only have to look at where other commonly recharged things are going to see that if EVs really do take over from ICEVs, IC is an inevitable progression.

Sure, they will have to do tests to make sure its safe etc but as far as your specific concerns go...

Transfer efficiency has been demonstrated to be as high as 98% - depending primarily on the proximity of the coils.  There is no reason why the vehicle's coil couldn't be made to move lower for charging tho I think it unlikely that it would be cost effective.  Cars with adaptive suspension would benefit automatically, of course.

It would be very easy to switch off the transmitting coil if no vehicle were present to charge - indeed the system would not want to be wasting energy like that anyway.

I can't see any significant danger to any sort of structure in close proximity to an erroneously energised transmitting coil.  You would have to have at least *some* sort of receiver coil to get any induced current and the likelihood of that happening in a way sufficient to cause a spark that, in turn, ignites some fuel left lying around or leaking is pretty unlikely.

As to quick-charging, I think the whole point is that these coils would be inserted on or beneath the road surface at designated parking bays with the specific intention that the EV parked in them would be there for a relatively long time - whilst the driver was at work for example and therefore, a high power 'connection' isn't really what they will be intended for.  That said, there is no reason that alternative arrangements, specifically designed for high power charging, couldn't be made.  The system can be very efficient indeed with little or no gap.  This could be arranged for buses and trucks, for example, (and cars too, really) but would need a more complex arrangement than just putting a fixed pad on the road/floor or burying the coil below the road surface.

I agree 100% that before we start spending money on making the EV experience less of a hassle (plugging in every evening is *such* a bore!) that we need first and foremost a well planned, well maintained and prolific rapid (50kW) AC and DC EVSE infrastructure.  Without it EVs will never become mass market as the range issue will (rightly or wrongly) always colour the decision making process when it comes to your average driver buying a new (or used, for that matter) car.  

If anyone is interested, the UK govenmnets stance on all this is available in 2 publications I dug up recently...

2011 'Making the Connection - The Plug-In Vehicle Infrastructure Strategy' - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/making-the-connection-the-plug-in-vehicle-infrastructure-strategy (either Word or PDF format)

...and the 2013 follow-up document 'Driving the Future Today - A strategy for ultra low emission vehicles in the UK' - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/driving-the-future-today-a-strategy-for-ultra-low-emission-vehicles-in-the-uk

I am trying my best at this time to make the powers-that-be here in the UK realise the importance of a rapid-charge infrastructure and stop wasting money on low power, AC, street-side charge points as well as these crazy, free, home EVSEs the UK government is funding (at a good £1k a pop when a simple (probably pre-existing) 3kW mains socket would do).  Unfortuantely, they are under the impression that private industry is going to provide the rapid charging infrastructure though comparing the earlier paper with the later one, I think the truth is beginning to dawn on them.  

Readers of these documents will note the equally depressing references to support for hydrogen as playing a large part in the move away from fossil-fueled vehicles.  Yeah, I know, don't get me started but it does show you how muddle-headed they are - just like the US government!

MW


On 27 Apr 2014, at 17:06, Dennis Miles wrote:

> Again with the wireless charging, show me a product I can buy today and is
> more efficient than a simple plug and wire.  A lot of talk and pictures of
> simulated dream products. The problems with direct wired charging are
> slight lack of convenience, but, I don't see any new technology for
> refueling with gasoline without stopping. And what is the transfer
> efficiency and what health hazards are the possible result of flinging
> kilowatts of energy into an area which may or may not be occupied by an EV
> and what happens when some misguided driver parks with his ICE fuel tank
> directly over a wireless recharging emitter. And a cord can give us Quick
> charging , is the wireless Quick charging?  Or are we going to invest more
> thousands in infrastructure in the name of convenience similar to the B.S.
> of the J1772 "Standard" trying to generate profits for infrastructure
> manufacturers or sales companies.  The only improvements necessary are
> lower cost and greater efficiencies, and thus greater range in the
> vehicles...
>
> *Dennis Lee Miles *
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sun, Apr 27, 2014 at 8:16 AM, brucedp5 <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>>
>> http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwgeeks/article/HELLA-Developing-New-Charging-Systems-For-Electric-Vehicles-2014042299
>> HELLA Developing New Charging Systems For Electric Vehicles
>> April 22 2014  HELLA
>>
>> PLYMOUTH, Mich., April 22, 2014 /PRNewswire/  HELLA is working with Paul
>> Vahle GmbH to develop wireless charging systems that could spark renewed
>> consumer interest in electric and hybrid-electric vehicles.
>>
>> Commonly used to recharge small consumer products such as smartphones and
>> electric toothbrushes, inductive or wireless charging for cars will make it
>> easier for drivers to charge car batteries and extend a vehicle's driving
>> range.
>>
>> Rather than using plug-in charging stations, car owners in the future will
>> simply need to park over an inductive charging unit to trigger the process,
>> according to Dr. Marc Rosenmayr, CEO for HELLA Electronics in North and
>> South America.
>>
>> He adds that if inductive charging coils were embedded in streets, electric
>> vehicles also could be recharged when stopped at traffic lights or even
>> while being driven.
>>
>> For electric car buyers, a contact-free method of transferring energy to
>> the
>> vehicle certainly will be more convenient and less time consuming. Cables
>> no
>> longer will be necessary. Inclement weather and the risk of vandalism also
>> can be avoided if outside charging stations are involved.
>>
>> "Wireless, inductive charging is a far more convenient way to recharge a
>> vehicle's battery system," Rosenmayr points out. "The driver only needs to
>> stop or drive over a charging unit or network to activate the process. As
>> wireless charging has become more available and easy to use, it also might
>> allow automakers to reduce battery size and weight on electric and hybrid
>> electric vehicles.
>>
>> Rosenmayr notes that a number of technological and infrastructure
>> challenges
>> still must be overcome before wireless charging for cars and light trucks
>> can be successfully introduced. Energy transfer over high-frequency fields
>> that are at the heart of inductive systems, for example, cause heat to
>> build
>> up in metal objects which could lead to safety issues. The impact that
>> wireless charging might have on other vehicle electronic systems such as
>> navigation, infotainment, driver-assistance and keyless entry systems also
>> will need to be studied.
>>
>> The cooperation between Vahle and HELLA combines the expertise and
>> experience of both companies in the field inductive charging. Based in
>> Kamen, Germany, Vahle has 15 years of experience in contact-free energy
>> transfer in industrial environments, while HELLA is a recognized leader in
>> the development of electronics, software, processes and production in the
>> auto industry.
>> [(c) 2014 Copyright Wisdom Digital Media]
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> http://evfleetworld.co.uk/news/2014/Apr/Hella-and-Vahle-partner-on-wireless-electric-vehicle-charging/0438014059
>> Hella and Vahle partner on wireless electric vehicle charging
>> 22 Apr 2014 - Hella and Vahle will partner to develop wireless charging
>> systems for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles Hella and Vahle will
>> partner to develop wireless charging systems for electric and plug-in
>> hybrid
>> vehicles
>> Component manufacturer Hella and contact-free energy transfer specialist
>> Paul Vahle GmbH have announced a partnership to develop wireless charging
>> systems for plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles.
>> [image
>>
>> http://evfleetworld.co.uk/news/2014/Apr/images/0438014059-9003-77181_jpg-320.jpg
>> Hella and Vahle will partner to develop wireless charging systems for
>> electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles
>> ] ...

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Re: EVLN: HELLA Developing New Inductive EVSE

EV professor
You have read between the lines quite correctly, Martin.
I feel like you said,"these crazy, free, home EVSEs the UK government is
funding (at a good £1k a pop when a simple (probably pre-existing) 3kW
mains socket would do)."  Most at home charging does not require the J1772
Level"2" installations at about $4,000 (USD) which is typical. And I don't
want to pay another $2,000 for auto mounted equipment, to avoid plugging in
a convenient plug when I get home. Or at work. And transfer efficiency of
98% is pure Hyperbole. A 20 foot long wire is less than 98% efficient. what
is the efficiency when misaligned by  15 cm ? either the efficiency goes
down or the charge rate lowers considerably. The best one I have seen in
literature has a motor with a roller attached set into the garage floor,
you park over the roller and the (under the garage) motor spins the roller
and you use regen braking mode to charge the battery. No equipment needed
in the car. The 50 HP electric motor made the cost of the
 installation about as much as a "J1722 charge Point" or about $5,000 (USD).

*Dennis Lee Miles *

*Director   **E.V.T.I. Inc.*

*E-Mail:*  *[hidden email]* <[hidden email]>

   *Phone #* *(863) 944-9913*

Dade City, Florida 33523

 USA




On Mon, Apr 28, 2014 at 4:42 AM, Martin WINLOW <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Dennis,
>
> So, I'm getting the tiniest feeling you don't think much of inductive
> charging (IC)?
>
> Whilst I agree that it's all vapourware at the moment you only have to
> look at where other commonly recharged things are going to see that if EVs
> really do take over from ICEVs, IC is an inevitable progression.
>
> Sure, they will have to do tests to make sure its safe etc but as far as
> your specific concerns go...
>
> Transfer efficiency has been demonstrated to be as high as 98% - depending
> primarily on the proximity of the coils.  There is no reason why the
> vehicle's coil couldn't be made to move lower for charging tho I think it
> unlikely that it would be cost effective.  Cars with adaptive suspension
> would benefit automatically, of course.
>
> It would be very easy to switch off the transmitting coil if no vehicle
> were present to charge - indeed the system would not want to be wasting
> energy like that anyway.
>
> I can't see any significant danger to any sort of structure in close
> proximity to an erroneously energised transmitting coil.  You would have to
> have at least *some* sort of receiver coil to get any induced current and
> the likelihood of that happening in a way sufficient to cause a spark that,
> in turn, ignites some fuel left lying around or leaking is pretty unlikely.
>
> As to quick-charging, I think the whole point is that these coils would be
> inserted on or beneath the road surface at designated parking bays with the
> specific intention that the EV parked in them would be there for a
> relatively long time - whilst the driver was at work for example and
> therefore, a high power 'connection' isn't really what they will be
> intended for.  That said, there is no reason that alternative arrangements,
> specifically designed for high power charging, couldn't be made.  The
> system can be very efficient indeed with little or no gap.  This could be
> arranged for buses and trucks, for example, (and cars too, really) but
> would need a more complex arrangement than just putting a fixed pad on the
> road/floor or burying the coil below the road surface.
>
> I agree 100% that before we start spending money on making the EV
> experience less of a hassle (plugging in every evening is *such* a bore!)
> that we need first and foremost a well planned, well maintained and
> prolific rapid (50kW) AC and DC EVSE infrastructure.  Without it EVs will
> never become mass market as the range issue will (rightly or wrongly)
> always colour the decision making process when it comes to your average
> driver buying a new (or used, for that matter) car.
>
> If anyone is interested, the UK govenmnets stance on all this is available
> in 2 publications I dug up recently...
>
> 2011 'Making the Connection - The Plug-In Vehicle Infrastructure Strategy'
> -
> https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/making-the-connection-the-plug-in-vehicle-infrastructure-strategy(either Word or PDF format)
>
> ...and the 2013 follow-up document 'Driving the Future Today - A strategy
> for ultra low emission vehicles in the UK' -
> https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/driving-the-future-today-a-strategy-for-ultra-low-emission-vehicles-in-the-uk
>
> I am trying my best at this time to make the powers-that-be here in the UK
> realise the importance of a rapid-charge infrastructure and stop wasting
> money on low power, AC, street-side charge points as well as these crazy,
> free, home EVSEs the UK government is funding (at a good £1k a pop when a
> simple (probably pre-existing) 3kW mains socket would do).  Unfortuantely,
> they are under the impression that private industry is going to provide the
> rapid charging infrastructure though comparing the earlier paper with the
> later one, I think the truth is beginning to dawn on them.
>
> Readers of these documents will note the equally depressing references to
> support for hydrogen as playing a large part in the move away from
> fossil-fueled vehicles.  Yeah, I know, don't get me started but it does
> show you how muddle-headed they are - just like the US government!
>
> MW
>
>
> On 27 Apr 2014, at 17:06, Dennis Miles wrote:
>
> > Again with the wireless charging, show me a product I can buy today and
> is
> > more efficient than a simple plug and wire.  A lot of talk and pictures
> of
> > simulated dream products. The problems with direct wired charging are
> > slight lack of convenience, but, I don't see any new technology for
> > refueling with gasoline without stopping. And what is the transfer
> > efficiency and what health hazards are the possible result of flinging
> > kilowatts of energy into an area which may or may not be occupied by an
> EV
> > and what happens when some misguided driver parks with his ICE fuel tank
> > directly over a wireless recharging emitter. And a cord can give us Quick
> > charging , is the wireless Quick charging?  Or are we going to invest
> more
> > thousands in infrastructure in the name of convenience similar to the
> B.S.
> > of the J1772 "Standard" trying to generate profits for infrastructure
> > manufacturers or sales companies.  The only improvements necessary are
> > lower cost and greater efficiencies, and thus greater range in the
> > vehicles...
> >
> > *Dennis Lee Miles *
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On Sun, Apr 27, 2014 at 8:16 AM, brucedp5 <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
> >
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwgeeks/article/HELLA-Developing-New-Charging-Systems-For-Electric-Vehicles-2014042299
> >> HELLA Developing New Charging Systems For Electric Vehicles
> >> April 22 2014  HELLA
> >>
> >> PLYMOUTH, Mich., April 22, 2014 /PRNewswire/  HELLA is working with Paul
> >> Vahle GmbH to develop wireless charging systems that could spark renewed
> >> consumer interest in electric and hybrid-electric vehicles.
> >>
> >> Commonly used to recharge small consumer products such as smartphones
> and
> >> electric toothbrushes, inductive or wireless charging for cars will
> make it
> >> easier for drivers to charge car batteries and extend a vehicle's
> driving
> >> range.
> >>
> >> Rather than using plug-in charging stations, car owners in the future
> will
> >> simply need to park over an inductive charging unit to trigger the
> process,
> >> according to Dr. Marc Rosenmayr, CEO for HELLA Electronics in North and
> >> South America.
> >>
> >> He adds that if inductive charging coils were embedded in streets,
> electric
> >> vehicles also could be recharged when stopped at traffic lights or even
> >> while being driven.
> >>
> >> For electric car buyers, a contact-free method of transferring energy to
> >> the
> >> vehicle certainly will be more convenient and less time consuming.
> Cables
> >> no
> >> longer will be necessary. Inclement weather and the risk of vandalism
> also
> >> can be avoided if outside charging stations are involved.
> >>
> >> "Wireless, inductive charging is a far more convenient way to recharge a
> >> vehicle's battery system," Rosenmayr points out. "The driver only needs
> to
> >> stop or drive over a charging unit or network to activate the process.
> As
> >> wireless charging has become more available and easy to use, it also
> might
> >> allow automakers to reduce battery size and weight on electric and
> hybrid
> >> electric vehicles.
> >>
> >> Rosenmayr notes that a number of technological and infrastructure
> >> challenges
> >> still must be overcome before wireless charging for cars and light
> trucks
> >> can be successfully introduced. Energy transfer over high-frequency
> fields
> >> that are at the heart of inductive systems, for example, cause heat to
> >> build
> >> up in metal objects which could lead to safety issues. The impact that
> >> wireless charging might have on other vehicle electronic systems such as
> >> navigation, infotainment, driver-assistance and keyless entry systems
> also
> >> will need to be studied.
> >>
> >> The cooperation between Vahle and HELLA combines the expertise and
> >> experience of both companies in the field inductive charging. Based in
> >> Kamen, Germany, Vahle has 15 years of experience in contact-free energy
> >> transfer in industrial environments, while HELLA is a recognized leader
> in
> >> the development of electronics, software, processes and production in
> the
> >> auto industry.
> >> [(c) 2014 Copyright Wisdom Digital Media]
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> http://evfleetworld.co.uk/news/2014/Apr/Hella-and-Vahle-partner-on-wireless-electric-vehicle-charging/0438014059
> >> Hella and Vahle partner on wireless electric vehicle charging
> >> 22 Apr 2014 - Hella and Vahle will partner to develop wireless charging
> >> systems for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles Hella and Vahle will
> >> partner to develop wireless charging systems for electric and plug-in
> >> hybrid
> >> vehicles
> >> Component manufacturer Hella and contact-free energy transfer specialist
> >> Paul Vahle GmbH have announced a partnership to develop wireless
> charging
> >> systems for plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles.
> >> [image
> >>
> >>
> http://evfleetworld.co.uk/news/2014/Apr/images/0438014059-9003-77181_jpg-320.jpg
> >> Hella and Vahle will partner to develop wireless charging systems for
> >> electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles
> >> ] ...
>
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Re: EVLN: HELLA Developing New Inductive EVSE

Lee Hart
In reply to this post by Martin WINLOW
Fundamentally, they're building a transformer. Ignore the marketing hype
about magical new energy transfer modes. It only looks different because
they're using high frequency transformer designs (like switchmode power
supplies use), instead of older 60Hz transformer designs.

Engineers pretty much know how to build safe, low-leakage, 98% efficient
transformers. Thus, the technical parts of the job are pretty
straightforward. It can be safe, efficient, and have very low leakage as
long as the designer knows what he's doing, and the marketing people
don't have too strong an influence (compromising performance for the
sake of appearance or cost).

*All* isolated chargers use a transformer for isolation anyway. So all
they are doing is repackaging the transformer so half of it is external,
and half in the car. Done right, this can be a good thing. It could
improve safety and reduce the overall complexity of the charging system.
The transformer serves both for isolation and coupling power to the
vehicle, thus eliminating the connector.

Unfortunately, this does not seem to be the direction they are headed.
The methods being shown are *more* complicated, more expensive, and less
likely to become any kind of standard. Personally, I think inductive
charging is being "sold" on the basis of

- convenience (it assumes people are too lazy to plug anything in)
- fear-mongering safety (connectors are "dangerous")
- money (it's a way to make more money on chargers)

I have to wonder why someone doesn't concentrate on a connector system
that auto-connects. That is bound to be simpler, more efficient, and
cheaper than these inductive systems. Way back in the 1960's, Bob Rice
was charging his EV with a drive-on connector system. Two flat metal
springs stuck up from a sheet of plywood. He drove his EV onto it, and
the springs hit a pair of mating terminals under the car. Power from the
car turned on a contactor in the off-board charger, which applied power
to the terminals to charge it. Simple as dirt.

--
"If an idea is good, really good; the way to oppose it is not with
force, but with complexity and regulations."
--
Lee Hart's EV projects are at http://www.sunrise-ev.com/LeesEVs.htm
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Re: EVLN: HELLA Developing New Inductive EVSE

Chris Tromley
On Mon, Apr 28, 2014 at 12:34 PM, Lee Hart <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I have to wonder why someone doesn't concentrate on a connector system
> that auto-connects.


Once again, Lee has offered a simpler, more direct solution - that will
never see widespread use because it's not flashy enough or sufficiently
high-tech.  I can see several viable approaches that would provide a
connector system with very high reliability that your grandmother (who
shouldn't even be driving anyway) could use with zero problems and much
less expense than an inductive system.

Society learns the hard way.  Maybe once some of these systems get put into
use and people see they don't offer any net advantage, sanity might prevail.

Chris
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