EVLN: Hyundai Ioniq ticks all the boxes on 10day test (v)

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EVLN: Hyundai Ioniq ticks all the boxes on 10day test (v)

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http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/manukau-courier/99632903/10-days-with-an-electric-vehicle-hyundai-ioniq-ticks-all-the-boxes
10 days with an electric vehicle: Hyundai Ioniq ticks all the boxes
January 8 2018  Chris Harrowell/STUFF

[images  / Chris Harrowell
https://resources.stuff.co.nz/content/dam/images/1/n/b/g/u/f/image.related.StuffLandscapeSixteenByNine.620x349.1nbh8n.png/1515372139372.jpg
The 2016 Hyundai Ioniq plugged into the Vector electric vehicle charging
station at the Vodafone Events Centre in Manukau

https://resources.stuff.co.nz/content/dam/images/1/n/b/g/u/j/image.related.StuffLandscapeSixteenByNine.620x349.1nbh8n.png/1515372139372.jpg
The car's interior is spacious and comfortable and features push-button
start

https://resources.stuff.co.nz/content/dam/images/1/n/b/g/u/l/image.related.StuffLandscapeSixteenByNine.620x349.1nbh8n.png/1515372139372.jpg
The electric Hyundai Ioniq has a range of about 200km when the battery is
full

https://resources.stuff.co.nz/content/dam/images/1/n/b/g/u/i/image.related.StuffLandscapeSixteenByNine.620x349.1nbh8n.png/1515372139372.jpg
The Hyundai Ioniq is powered by a 360 volt battery which charges its 88
kilowatt electric motor

https://resources.stuff.co.nz/content/dam/images/1/n/b/j/z/4/image.related.StuffLandscapeSixteenByNine.620x349.1nbh8n.png/1515372139372.jpg
Vector chief executive Simon Mackenzie, left, joined then-Transport Minister
Simon Bridges at the unveiling of two new rapid electric vehicle charging
stations at Auckland Airport Shopping Centre in August 2016

https://resources.stuff.co.nz/content/dam/images/1/n/b/g/u/h/image.related.StuffLandscapeSixteenByNine.620x349.1nbh8n.png/1515372139372.jpg
The fully electric Hyundai Ioniq can travel up to 165kmh

https://resources.stuff.co.nz/content/dam/images/1/n/b/g/u/g/image.related.StuffLandscapeSixteenByNine.620x349.1nbh8n.png/1515372139372.jpg
How fast the car's battery is topped up depends on the type of electric
charger used


video  flash
]

Hyundai Motors NZ’s Bevan Redpath talks about the electric Hyundai Ioniq.

I've seen the future of motoring and it looks a lot like a humble four-door
sedan.

In an effort to find out what it's like to use an electric vehicle, Hyundai
supplied me with a 2016 Hyundai Ioniq to test over a 10-day period.

I drove it to-and-from work and used it to get to interviews all over south
Auckland.

At around $51,000, the first impressions of the 2016 model are that it's
extremely comfortable.

It has light steering, welcoming seats, a reversing camera and a top-notch
stereo.

The car's interior is spacious and comfortable and features push-button
start.

The transmission is put into drive, park, reverse or neutral by pressing a
button rather than moving a gear stick.

In terms of the car's performance, it's more than quick enough and 'sport'
mode takes its acceleration to another level.

One of the things I was most intrigued about is the range of electric
vehicles, which is the distance they can cover using only the battery and
electric motor.

The electric Hyundai Ioniq has a range of about 200km when the battery is
full.

EV owners will be well aware of the phenomenon known as 'range anxiety',
when there's the feeling or worry the car will run out of power while on the
road.

The Ioniq has an advertised range of about 200km, depending on how it's
driven.

It wasn't difficult with a little planning to keep it charged sufficiently
so the range stayed above 100km.

Hyundai Motors NZ technical support and trainer Bevan Redpath says the
Hyundai Ioniq's 360 volt battery is comprised of 96 individual cells.

But I did find my eyes frequently darting from the road to the car's digital
display to see how quickly the range was falling.

It was surprising to see how much the range was affected by using the
vehicle's basic features.

Turn on the air conditioning or heater and the range immediately dropped by
20km.

Some public charging stations tell the electric vehicle user how long it
will take to fully charge their car's battery.

Some public charging stations tell the electric vehicle user how long it
will take to fully charge their car's battery.

During the 10 days I had the Ioniq, I twice used the Vector electric vehicle
charging station at the Vodafone Events Centre in Manukau.

It's free to use but it's not exactly quick.

Plugging the car in for about 45 minutes took the range from about 120km up
to about 150km.

The Hyundai Ioniq is powered by a 360 volt battery which charges its 88
kilowatt electric motor.

I also used the free Vector charging station at the Auckland Airport
Shopping Centre on George Bolt Memorial Dr.

This one is a 'rapid' charging station and the difference between it and a
standard charger is obvious.

It took the car from about 170km of range to full in less than 10 minutes.

The third charging option is to plug an EV into the three-point plug at
home, which I did several times.

It's a laborious process and made the public rapid charger a far more
attractive option.

My monthly power bill only increased by about $6.

How much that increase is down to charging the Ioniq at home is unknown.

Driving it for more than a week was an enjoyable experience and I now know
why EV owners love them so much.

Would I buy one? Absolutely. Now I just need to win Powerball.

HOW IT WORKS
Hyundai Motors NZ technical support and trainer Bevan Redpath says the
Ioniq's 360 volt battery is comprised of 96 individual cells, each of which
is a 3.7 volt lithium polymer battery.

"That (the battery) transmits 360 volts of DC (power) to the motor in the
front of the car and is then in turn converted into 360 volts AC, which
drives the 88 kilowatt motor."

Redpath says the Ioniq's transmission has just one gear and is coupled to
the car's electric motor.

It can spin the motor up to 11,000 revs per minute. The car is limited to a
top speed of 165kmh.

Redpath says charging the car from empty to full by plugging it into a
three-point plug at home can take up to 17 hours.

Wall-mounted chargers will fill it with power in about four hours and a DC
fast charger can do the job in about 30 minutes, he says.

"When you're motoring for about 200km, or about two hours, there's a lot of
(charging) stations around the country so you can pull over, charge the car
for half an hour, have a rest and refresh yourself and get back in and be on
your way."

Redpath says the Ioniq is fitted with safety features including autonomous
emergency braking, smart cruise control, blind spot detection, lane
departure warning, and a reversing camera.

'PERCEPTIONS INACCURATE'
Former Transport Minister Simon Bridges is one of the most high profile EV
advocates in New Zealand.

His family owns two plug-in hybrid vehicles, a Mitsubishi Outlander Phev and
an Audi A3 e-tron.

Bridges says the perception that EVs are owned by "cardigan-wearing types"
couldn't be further from the truth.

"The performance will only increase as the technology gets better.

"For many people the original purchase price (of an EV) may be high and it
can be a bit off-putting, but over the course of its life it works out even.

"Every month that goes by I think we're going to get EVs that will be a
better economic proposition.

"They have no road user charges and they're cheaper to run.

"It works out to about 30 cents a litre by plugging it into wall."

Bridges says there are numerous reasons to buy and drive an electric
vehicle, including the environment and climate change.

He charges up his hybrid vehicles every night and says the Mitsubishi can
cover up to 600km on a full battery.

"I think concerns around range anxiety are a bit overdone.

"If you've got a hybrid you can get anywhere without any range issues.

"We've gone from next to no charging infrastructure to more than 125 public
charging stations (in New Zealand).

"By the time it takes to have a coffee the car will be juiced up and ready
to go again."
[© stuff.co.nz]


+
http://www.news18.com/news/auto/hyundai-to-celebrate-20th-anniversary-at-auto-expo-2018-1646981.html
Hyundai To Celebrate 20th Anniversary at Auto Expo 2018
January 31, 2018  Hyundai will also showcase IONIQ which is World’s first
car to offer all 3 electrified versions – Hybrid; Plug-in & All Electric ...
http://img01.ibnlive.in/ibnlive/uploads/2017/06/2018-hyundai-kona-2.jpg


https://www.carwale.com/news/hyundai-to-invest-over-1-billion-in-india-by-2020-32925/Hyundai
to invest over $1 Billion in India by 2020
Jan 31 2018  Further elaborating on the company's foray in electric vehicles
(EV), Koo said, “Our first EV in India will be launched next year. At the
moment we are yet to finalize whether it will be the Ioniq EV sedan or the
full electric version of SUV Kona.” Hyundai is also studying the Indian
market to understand customer preference ...




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