(Fwd) Re: Design News: Should You Buy a Used Electric V

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(Fwd) Re: Design News: Should You Buy a Used Electric V

Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
Forwarding for Bob Keeland.  The listserver blocked his message because it
was too long.  That's partly because it was top-posted on an already long
post, and partly because it had a load of poorly formed HTML attached to it.

David (sysop/mod)

------- Forwarded message follows -------

From: Bobby Keeland <*******@gmail.com>
Date sent: Thu, 19 Apr 2018 21:52:10 -0500
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Design News: Should You Buy a Used Electric Vehicle?
To: paul dove <******@bellsouth.net>,
        Electric Vehicle Discussion List <[hidden email]>
Copies to: ************@optonline.net

Len, Thank you for the information in your posting. Like most of the
articles in the EVDL it was very interesting and informative. I don't,
however, understand part of your posting. You say:  

"Before the arrival of the Nissan Leaf in 2011, the battery electric-vehicle

(EV) market was almost non-existent. The Leaf and the Chevrolet Volt proved
to be a vanguard of what was to follow."  

The Chevy Volt is a hybrid, albeit a plug-in hybrid. The Toyota Prius is
also a hybrid and it was introduced much earlier than the Volt, in 1997
(source of information Wikipedia). Was that not the true vanguard for the
later hybrids, plug-in hybrids and the true battery powered electric cars?
When the Prius was introduced the American auto manufacturers kind of worked

with hybrid design, but then decided not to make any for sale to the public.

The popularity of the Prius spurred the American manufacturers to rebook at
hybrid technology, while the introduction of the Tesla Model S really
spurred the idea of the fully electric cars. Yes, the Nissan Leaf predated
the Tesla, but it did not seem to really catch the attention of potential
electric car buyers like the Tesla did.  

I am a bit biased because my son bought a Prius hybrid in 2007 and still
loves it. On the other hand I have reserved a Tesla Model 3. Although I have

received a notice to configure that Tesla I have decided to wait until they
make a less expensive Model 3 with only 220 mile range and a less fancy
interior. That variety will not be available until about early 2019, but I
can wait.

Bob Keeland
Louisiana  
David Roden - Akron, Ohio, USA
EVDL Administrator

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Re: (Fwd) Re: Design News: Should You Buy a Used Electric V

Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
> From: Bobby Keeland
>
> "Before the arrival of the Nissan Leaf in 2011, the battery electric-vehicle
> (EV) market was almost non-existent. The Leaf and the Chevrolet Volt proved
> to be a vanguard of what was to follow."
>
> The Chevy Volt is a hybrid, albeit a plug-in hybrid. The Toyota Prius is
> also a hybrid and it was introduced much earlier than the Volt, in 1997
> (source of information Wikipedia). Was that not the true vanguard for the
> later hybrids, plug-in hybrids and the true battery powered electric cars?

I agree. The article was poorly-researched and over-simplified, leading
to a number of false conclusions. The Prius came out much earlier, and
sold in much larger numbers than the Volt. Similarly, more Leafs have
been sold than Teslas. But the Volt and Tesla get a lot of press. A
reporter that only does 10 minutes of research and blindly believes the
company PR is going erroneously conclude that they are all that matter,
and everything else was "almost non-existent".

The problem is, you can't really say when a new technology "takes off".
There is always a continuous growth curve, spread over many decades.
Like compound interest, it just keeps growing at some percent, year
after year.

If you put $1 in the bank each week, starting as a kid, the money just
keep growing. At what point are you "rich"? That point varies depending
on who you talk to. Your little sister thinks you're rich when you have
$100. Your high school friends when you have $1000. Your dad when you
have $10,000. Your kids when you have $100,000. And you still don't feel
rich even at $1,000,000 when you retire, given the high cost of living.

It's the same with EVs. They've been growing for 50+ years! But the
casual reporter doesn't notice the Citicars, or Toyota RAV4-EVs, or any
other pioneers.

--
I look for what needs to be done. After all, that's how the universe
designs itself. -- R. Buckminster Fuller
--
Lee Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, www.sunrise-ev.com
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