Lacey, WA Alternative Energy Fair Success Despite Rain

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Lacey, WA Alternative Energy Fair Success Despite Rain

MPaulHolmes
    About a year ago, I converted an old mountain bike to electric.  Lacey, my home town, was having an energy fair this last Saturday, so I called up city hall to find out if I could have a booth to display it.  The day started really rainy, but there were still a good number of people.  I had a nice display on a cardboard backing (my wife put it together) that was getting soaked (I wasn't very prepared), and a fellow ev-er lent me a big tent.  
    I bet I talked to about 100 people in-depth about how the bike works, the cost, how to assemble the lead acid pack, etc.  Almost none of them had ever seen an electric bike.  They loved the simplicity of the front hub motor.  Plus, my setup was cheap, so I got to tell them that it can be done for $300-350.  People ranging in ages from 10 to 80 (not joking!) took turns riding the e-bike all around Huntamer Park.  Most came back with that famous EV grin (it can happen even from e-bikes!!).  These people were hungry for alternatives for their transportation.  It was really exciting to see!  Lee's tipping point isn't here yet, but if we get out there and show our stuff, people are perhaps more willing to listen now than ever before.
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Re: Lacey, WA Alternative Energy Fair Success Despite Rain

Ted C.
 I love the Lacey alternative fuel fair just for the simple fact of having
at that perfect time of the year that gas prices are shooting up. The "SHOCK
and AW" ( to borrow a term) of gas prices really gets their attention of
where things are headed. If it was at the end of the summer the people are
use to the prices by then and would not get as high of a turn out. The only
gamble in a western Washington spring is that rain factor. But liquid sun
shine rarely dentures the hard core Washingtonian. We don't tan, we rust.

Ted
Lacey, WA
http://www.evalbum.com/915
N47 03.442 W122 49.108
"THE Stone Age did not end for lack of stone, and the Oil Age will end long
before the world runs out of oil."
Quotation is from Sheikh Zaki Yamani, a Saudi Arabian who served as his
country's oil minister three decades ago.


----- Original Message -----
From: "paul holmes" <[hidden email]>
To: <[hidden email]>
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2008 6:48 PM
Subject: [EVDL] Lacey, WA Alternative Energy Fair Success Despite Rain


>
>    About a year ago, I converted an old mountain bike to electric.  Lacey,
> my home town, was having an energy fair this last Saturday, so I called up
> city hall to find out if I could have a booth to display it.  The day
> started really rainy, but there were still a good number of people.  I had
> a
> nice display on a cardboard backing (my wife put it together) that was
> getting soaked (I wasn't very prepared), and a fellow ev-er lent me a big
> tent.
>    I bet I talked to about 100 people in-depth about how the bike works,
> the cost, how to assemble the lead acid pack, etc.  Almost none of them
> had
> ever seen an electric bike.  They loved the simplicity of the front hub
> motor.  Plus, my setup was cheap, so I got to tell them that it can be
> done
> for $300-350.  People ranging in ages from 10 to 80 (not joking!) took
> turns
> riding the e-bike all around Huntamer Park.  Most came back with that
> famous
> EV grin (it can happen even from e-bikes!!).  These people were hungry for
> alternatives for their transportation.  It was really exciting to see!
> Lee's tipping point isn't here yet, but if we get out there and show our
> stuff, people are perhaps more willing to listen now than ever before.
> --
> View this message in context:
> http://www.nabble.com/Lacey%2C-WA-Alternative-Energy-Fair-Success-Despite-Rain-tp17053549p17053549.html
> Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at
> Nabble.com.
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
>


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Re: Lacey, WA Alternative Energy Fair Success Despite Rain

dave cover-2
In reply to this post by MPaulHolmes
Paul

Can you give some details of the bike and the components you used. I'm
looking to do the same. I already have a donor, but I don't know anything
about bike conversions.

Dave Cover

On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 9:48 PM, paul holmes <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>    About a year ago, I converted an old mountain bike to electric.  Lacey,
> my home town, was having an energy fair this last Saturday, so I called up
> city hall to find out if I could have a booth to display it.  The day
> started really rainy, but there were still a good number of people.  I had
> a
> nice display on a cardboard backing (my wife put it together) that was
> getting soaked (I wasn't very prepared), and a fellow ev-er lent me a big
> tent.
>    I bet I talked to about 100 people in-depth about how the bike works,
> the cost, how to assemble the lead acid pack, etc.  Almost none of them
> had
> ever seen an electric bike.  They loved the simplicity of the front hub
> motor.  Plus, my setup was cheap, so I got to tell them that it can be
> done
> for $300-350.  People ranging in ages from 10 to 80 (not joking!) took
> turns
> riding the e-bike all around Huntamer Park.  Most came back with that
> famous
> EV grin (it can happen even from e-bikes!!).  These people were hungry for
> alternatives for their transportation.  It was really exciting to see!
> Lee's tipping point isn't here yet, but if we get out there and show our
> stuff, people are perhaps more willing to listen now than ever before.
> --
> View this message in context:
> http://www.nabble.com/Lacey%2C-WA-Alternative-Energy-Fair-Success-Despite-Rain-tp17053549p17053549.html
> Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at
> Nabble.com.
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
_______________________________________________
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Converting a bike to electric using a front hub motor.

MPaulHolmes
You are going to love how easy it is. I bought a Crystalyte brushed DC hub motor already built into a front wheel (no tire though).  Also, buy a brushed DC 36/48v 20amp or 35amp motor controller.  Next, buy some cheapo 7 amp-hr batteries, and wire them in series, to either 36 or 48v.  I bought 8 of them, so that altogether, I have 48v 14amp-hrs.  You need some sort of back rack on the bike that you can buy at a bike shop to set your batteries on.  Also, buy a little on/off switch from home depot.  connect it to one of the leads to your battery pack, for easy shutoff of power when you want to.  Finally, attach 30 amp Anderson connectors to the leads of the battery pack (after the switch) so you can plug the pack into the controller.  Mount the controller where ever you want.  (I just used a bunch of electrical tape).

BattPackNeg------------------------------------AndersonConnector
BattPackPlus---------ON/OFFSwitch-------------AndersonConnector

Anderson connectors come pre-installed on the leads for the motor controller, and for the motor, so the rest you just plug in.
To charge the battery pack, just disconnect from the controller (make sure ON/OFF is set to ON) and plug it into the charger first, then plug the charger into the wall.


I used "ebikes.ca".  They were very helpful, and it's pretty reasonable prices.  
For batteries, I got them on Ebay from the following guy.  They have worked great for 6 months so far, charging and discharging them EVERY DAY:

Ebay 7 amp-hr Lead Acid Batteries

dave cover-2 wrote
Paul

Can you give some details of the bike and the components you used. I'm
looking to do the same. I already have a donor, but I don't know anything
about bike conversions.

Dave Cover

On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 9:48 PM, paul holmes <barbiesbla@gmail.com> wrote:

>
>    About a year ago, I converted an old mountain bike to electric.  Lacey,
> my home town, was having an energy fair this last Saturday, so I called up
> city hall to find out if I could have a booth to display it.  The day
> started really rainy, but there were still a good number of people.  I had
> a
> nice display on a cardboard backing (my wife put it together) that was
> getting soaked (I wasn't very prepared), and a fellow ev-er lent me a big
> tent.
>    I bet I talked to about 100 people in-depth about how the bike works,
> the cost, how to assemble the lead acid pack, etc.  Almost none of them
> had
> ever seen an electric bike.  They loved the simplicity of the front hub
> motor.  Plus, my setup was cheap, so I got to tell them that it can be
> done
> for $300-350.  People ranging in ages from 10 to 80 (not joking!) took
> turns
> riding the e-bike all around Huntamer Park.  Most came back with that
> famous
> EV grin (it can happen even from e-bikes!!).  These people were hungry for
> alternatives for their transportation.  It was really exciting to see!
> Lee's tipping point isn't here yet, but if we get out there and show our
> stuff, people are perhaps more willing to listen now than ever before.
> --
> View this message in context:
> http://www.nabble.com/Lacey%2C-WA-Alternative-Energy-Fair-Success-Despite-Rain-tp17053549p17053549.html
> Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at
> Nabble.com.
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
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Ebike Howto Correction

MPaulHolmes
In reply to this post by dave cover-2
Oops!  I added the wrong link in my last message.  Here is the correct link.  I know for sure that these batteries are good.  The other ones only might be good.

Real Link to 7Amp-Hr 12 volt batteries on Ebay
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Re: Ebike Howto Correction

dave cover-2
Any estimates on your mileage? How well does the hubmotor handle hills? Any
heat issues?

I might be in a situation where I need to climb a big hill near the end of
my ride and I'm wondering how much assistance it can give.

Thanks

Dave Cover

On Mon, May 5, 2008 at 1:00 PM, paul holmes <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Oops!  I added the wrong link in my last message.  Here is the correct
> link.
> I know for sure that these batteries are good.  The other ones only might
> be
> good.
>
>
> http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=110247370777&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT&ih=001
> Real Link to 7Amp-Hr 12 volt batteries on Ebay
> --
> View this message in context:
> http://www.nabble.com/Lacey%2C-WA-Alternative-Energy-Fair-Success-Despite-Rain-tp17053549p17066146.html
> Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at
> Nabble.com.
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
_______________________________________________
For subscription options, see
http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
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Re: Ebike Howto Correction

MPaulHolmes
This is the weakest motor that "ebikes.ca" sells.  Climbing hills requires pedal assist.  With my 14 amp-hr 48v setup, I get a theoretical range (down to about 70% empty) of about 25 miles with some pedaling (relaxed pedaling occasionally).  Theoretical, because I usually only go about 5 or 6 miles each way, and recharge when I get to my destination.  The motor gets warm, but I haven't had any problems with it getting too hot.

"ebikes.ca" has torque and speed monsters that can fit in the front hub.  But instead of a $350 setup, you may have to pay more like $500-$750.  The website has a speed/torque simulator for every type of motor/controller/voltage scenario.  The range would be maybe half if you get a freak like the 5304 motor.  But at least you could lay back and take a nap while going up any hill you would ever encounter.

dave cover-2 wrote
Any estimates on your mileage? How well does the hubmotor handle hills? Any
heat issues?

I might be in a situation where I need to climb a big hill near the end of
my ride and I'm wondering how much assistance it can give.

Thanks
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Re: Ebike Howto Correction

Chuck Hays
In reply to this post by MPaulHolmes

> From: paul holmes

> "ebikes.ca" has torque and speed monsters that can fit in the front hub.
> But instead of a $350 setup, you may have to pay more like $500-$750. The
> website has a speed/torque simulator for every type of
> motor/controller/voltage scenario. The range would be maybe half if you get
> a freak like the 5304 motor. But at least you could lay back and take a nap
> while going up any hill you would ever encounter.

I've got a Crystalite 406 and a 35A controller, going
into an XtraCycle with 48V 30Ah. I've got some hills
to get over. Because apparently fuel prices went up
when I wasn't paying attention for the last couple
of years (grin) the subframe kit got hung up in a
shipping container somewhere between Taiwan and
Canada.

This isn't a "$350 setup" but for a little more
demanding condition it oughta be adequate. Like
100 km worth of "adequate." :)=)}

Those 5000-series motors, now -- I'm in serious
lust. I want one in a very light space frame running
72V. No pedals on that one, just pure speed. Or I
may do the same thing in a nice sprung freeride
frame and make an off-roader out of it, considering
that where I live the ratio of paved to unpaved roads
is like 1:20. But I gotta get "Fast and Bulbous"
finished first.

Chuck Hays
Kamloops, BC
(10 points to anyone who knows where the name
of the project comes from...)
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Re: Ebike Howto Correction

Adrian DeLeon
In reply to this post by MPaulHolmes
Dave,

I've been using the "Bike Electrified" 400W brushless hub motor kit from  
Wilderness Energy for a few years now. I bought it specifically to climb a  
hill in the middle of my ride. It won't climb on batteries alone, but now  
I can make at least 2 trips up with a 30 pound passenger! Without the  
assist I could barely make it up solo and needed a short break at the top.

I've never gone more than 12 miles on a charge, so the ultimate range is  
unknown. I've had the front wheel slip a bit while climbing in loose  
gravel. Leaning forward helps... I'm also careful not to hit curbs and  
possibly dent the front rim.

It's also great for riding in a headwind. You can maintain speed without  
burning out the legs :) If I was doing a 2nd bike, I'd probably use a 600W  
to 1000W motor. Bicycle conversions are also relatively inexpensive for  
conversion to Lithium.

http://www.evalbum.com/777

-Adrian

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Re: Ebike Howto Correction

Frank John
In reply to this post by MPaulHolmes
My son and I put together a 5304 front-wheel kit with 48V of 12 A-H batteries and it's a blast.  Check out http://endless-sphere.com/forums/ for lots of discussion.  Good grin stuff.

----- Original Message ----
From: paul holmes <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Monday, May 5, 2008 1:26:01 PM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Ebike Howto Correction


This is the weakest motor that "ebikes.ca" sells.  Climbing hills requires
pedal assist.  With my 14 amp-hr 48v setup, I get a theoretical range (down
to about 70% empty) of about 25 miles with some pedaling (relaxed pedaling
occasionally).  Theoretical, because I usually only go about 5 or 6 miles
each way, and recharge when I get to my destination.  The motor gets warm,
but I haven't had any problems with it getting too hot.

"ebikes.ca" has torque and speed monsters that can fit in the front hub.
But instead of a $350 setup, you may have to pay more like $500-$750.  The
website has a speed/torque simulator for every type of
motor/controller/voltage scenario.  The range would be maybe half if you get
a freak like the 5304 motor.  But at least you could lay back and take a nap
while going up any hill you would ever encounter.


dave cover-2 wrote:

>
> Any estimates on your mileage? How well does the hubmotor handle hills?
> Any
> heat issues?
>
> I might be in a situation where I need to climb a big hill near the end of
> my ride and I'm wondering how much assistance it can give.
>
> Thanks
>
>

--
View this message in context: http://www.nabble.com/Lacey%2C-WA-Alternative-Energy-Fair-Success-Despite-Rain-tp17053549p17067806.html
Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

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Re: Converting a bike to electric using a front hub motor.

richarddthomas
In reply to this post by MPaulHolmes
Hi Folks have been riding my recumbent Bike-E for a year now with a 36 volt
motorized kit from a company called Electrik Motion which includes all the
components you described. I paid $499.00 for the kit. I live in  hilly
Connecticut, USA. An average ride for me is 20 -25 miles and  am left with
plenty of juice left after each ride. The bike will do 15 miles per hour on
the motor alone (without peddling)on a flat road for 12 miles. I use the
motor sparingly, only for assist on the big hills. This not only extends my
range, but allows a more even ride as far as exertion goes ,which puts me in
more control of my own escercise and I get to be out on th elocal bike, rail
trails in the fresh air almost daily. I have just passed the 30000 mile mark
on my odometer.
Richard Thomas
----- Original Message -----
From: "paul holmes" <[hidden email]>
To: <[hidden email]>
Sent: Monday, May 05, 2008 12:55 PM
Subject: [EVDL] Converting a bike to electric using a front hub motor.


>
> You are going to love how easy it is. I bought a Crystalyte brushed DC hub
> motor already built into a front wheel (no tire though).  Also, buy a
> brushed DC 36/48v 20amp or 35amp motor controller.  Next, buy some cheapo
> 7
> amp-hr batteries, and wire them in series, to either 36 or 48v.  I bought
> 8
> of them, so that altogether, I have 48v 14amp-hrs.  You need some sort of
> back rack on the bike that you can buy at a bike shop to set your
> batteries
> on.  Also, buy a little on/off switch from home depot.  connect it to one
> of
> the leads to your battery pack, for easy shutoff of power when you want
> to.
> Finally, attach 30 amp Anderson connectors to the leads of the battery
> pack
> (after the switch) so you can plug the pack into the controller.  Mount
> the
> controller where ever you want.  (I just used a bunch of electrical tape).
>
> BattPackNeg------------------------------------AndersonConnector
> BattPackPlus---------ON/OFFSwitch-------------AndersonConnector
>
> Anderson connectors come pre-installed on the leads for the motor
> controller, and for the motor, so the rest you just plug in.
> To charge the battery pack, just disconnect from the controller (make sure
> ON/OFF is set to ON) and plug it into the charger first, then plug the
> charger into the wall.
>
>
> I used "ebikes.ca".  They were very helpful, and it's pretty reasonable
> prices.
> For batteries, I got them on Ebay from the following guy.  They have
> worked
> great for 6 months so far, charging and discharging them EVERY DAY:
>
> http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=260236362581&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT&ih=016
> Ebay 7 amp-hr Lead Acid Batteries
>
>
> dave cover-2 wrote:
>>
>> Paul
>>
>> Can you give some details of the bike and the components you used. I'm
>> looking to do the same. I already have a donor, but I don't know anything
>> about bike conversions.
>>
>> Dave Cover
>>
>> On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 9:48 PM, paul holmes <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>    About a year ago, I converted an old mountain bike to electric.
>>> Lacey,
>>> my home town, was having an energy fair this last Saturday, so I called
>>> up
>>> city hall to find out if I could have a booth to display it.  The day
>>> started really rainy, but there were still a good number of people.  I
>>> had
>>> a
>>> nice display on a cardboard backing (my wife put it together) that was
>>> getting soaked (I wasn't very prepared), and a fellow ev-er lent me a
>>> big
>>> tent.
>>>    I bet I talked to about 100 people in-depth about how the bike works,
>>> the cost, how to assemble the lead acid pack, etc.  Almost none of them
>>> had
>>> ever seen an electric bike.  They loved the simplicity of the front hub
>>> motor.  Plus, my setup was cheap, so I got to tell them that it can be
>>> done
>>> for $300-350.  People ranging in ages from 10 to 80 (not joking!) took
>>> turns
>>> riding the e-bike all around Huntamer Park.  Most came back with that
>>> famous
>>> EV grin (it can happen even from e-bikes!!).  These people were hungry
>>> for
>>> alternatives for their transportation.  It was really exciting to see!
>>> Lee's tipping point isn't here yet, but if we get out there and show our
>>> stuff, people are perhaps more willing to listen now than ever before.
>>> --
>>> View this message in context:
>>> http://www.nabble.com/Lacey%2C-WA-Alternative-Energy-Fair-Success-Despite-Rain-tp17053549p17053549.html
>>> Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at
>>> Nabble.com.
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> For subscription options, see
>>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> For subscription options, see
>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>
>>
>
> --
> View this message in context:
> http://www.nabble.com/Lacey%2C-WA-Alternative-Energy-Fair-Success-Despite-Rain-tp17053549p17066031.html
> Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at
> Nabble.com.
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>


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Re: Converting a bike to electric using a front hub motor.

Thomas Brannan
Please use all caution and safety equip. when riding these kind of
bikes. My son is currently recovering
from two broken elbows after a crash on his hub motor propelled bike.
It will go 25 mph and
should be thought of like a "motor"cycle (which it is), instead of
like a bicycle.
Regards,
Tom Brannan

On Sun, May 11, 2008 at 3:52 AM, richarddthomas
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Folks have been riding my recumbent Bike-E for a year now with a 36 volt
> motorized kit from a company called Electrik Motion which includes all the
> components you described. I paid $499.00 for the kit. I live in  hilly
> Connecticut, USA. An average ride for me is 20 -25 miles and  am left with
> plenty of juice left after each ride. The bike will do 15 miles per hour on
> the motor alone (without peddling)on a flat road for 12 miles. I use the
> motor sparingly, only for assist on the big hills. This not only extends my
> range, but allows a more even ride as far as exertion goes ,which puts me in
> more control of my own escercise and I get to be out on th elocal bike, rail
> trails in the fresh air almost daily. I have just passed the 30000 mile mark
> on my odometer.
> Richard Thomas
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "paul holmes" <[hidden email]>
> To: <[hidden email]>
> Sent: Monday, May 05, 2008 12:55 PM
> Subject: [EVDL] Converting a bike to electric using a front hub motor.
>
>
>>
>> You are going to love how easy it is. I bought a Crystalyte brushed DC hub
>> motor already built into a front wheel (no tire though).  Also, buy a
>> brushed DC 36/48v 20amp or 35amp motor controller.  Next, buy some cheapo
>> 7
>> amp-hr batteries, and wire them in series, to either 36 or 48v.  I bought
>> 8
>> of them, so that altogether, I have 48v 14amp-hrs.  You need some sort of
>> back rack on the bike that you can buy at a bike shop to set your
>> batteries
>> on.  Also, buy a little on/off switch from home depot.  connect it to one
>> of
>> the leads to your battery pack, for easy shutoff of power when you want
>> to.
>> Finally, attach 30 amp Anderson connectors to the leads of the battery
>> pack
>> (after the switch) so you can plug the pack into the controller.  Mount
>> the
>> controller where ever you want.  (I just used a bunch of electrical tape).
>>
>> BattPackNeg------------------------------------AndersonConnector
>> BattPackPlus---------ON/OFFSwitch-------------AndersonConnector
>>
>> Anderson connectors come pre-installed on the leads for the motor
>> controller, and for the motor, so the rest you just plug in.
>> To charge the battery pack, just disconnect from the controller (make sure
>> ON/OFF is set to ON) and plug it into the charger first, then plug the
>> charger into the wall.
>>
>>
>> I used "ebikes.ca".  They were very helpful, and it's pretty reasonable
>> prices.
>> For batteries, I got them on Ebay from the following guy.  They have
>> worked
>> great for 6 months so far, charging and discharging them EVERY DAY:
>>
>> http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=260236362581&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT&ih=016
>> Ebay 7 amp-hr Lead Acid Batteries
>>
>>
>> dave cover-2 wrote:
>>>
>>> Paul
>>>
>>> Can you give some details of the bike and the components you used. I'm
>>> looking to do the same. I already have a donor, but I don't know anything
>>> about bike conversions.
>>>
>>> Dave Cover
>>>
>>> On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 9:48 PM, paul holmes <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>>    About a year ago, I converted an old mountain bike to electric.
>>>> Lacey,
>>>> my home town, was having an energy fair this last Saturday, so I called
>>>> up
>>>> city hall to find out if I could have a booth to display it.  The day
>>>> started really rainy, but there were still a good number of people.  I
>>>> had
>>>> a
>>>> nice display on a cardboard backing (my wife put it together) that was
>>>> getting soaked (I wasn't very prepared), and a fellow ev-er lent me a
>>>> big
>>>> tent.
>>>>    I bet I talked to about 100 people in-depth about how the bike works,
>>>> the cost, how to assemble the lead acid pack, etc.  Almost none of them
>>>> had
>>>> ever seen an electric bike.  They loved the simplicity of the front hub
>>>> motor.  Plus, my setup was cheap, so I got to tell them that it can be
>>>> done
>>>> for $300-350.  People ranging in ages from 10 to 80 (not joking!) took
>>>> turns
>>>> riding the e-bike all around Huntamer Park.  Most came back with that
>>>> famous
>>>> EV grin (it can happen even from e-bikes!!).  These people were hungry
>>>> for
>>>> alternatives for their transportation.  It was really exciting to see!
>>>> Lee's tipping point isn't here yet, but if we get out there and show our
>>>> stuff, people are perhaps more willing to listen now than ever before.
>>>> --
>>>> View this message in context:
>>>> http://www.nabble.com/Lacey%2C-WA-Alternative-Energy-Fair-Success-Despite-Rain-tp17053549p17053549.html
>>>> Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at
>>>> Nabble.com.
>>>>
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> For subscription options, see
>>>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> For subscription options, see
>>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>>
>>>
>>
>> --
>> View this message in context:
>> http://www.nabble.com/Lacey%2C-WA-Alternative-Energy-Fair-Success-Despite-Rain-tp17053549p17066031.html
>> Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at
>> Nabble.com.
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> For subscription options, see
>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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--
There's more than one way to smoke a 'possum...

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Re: Converting a bike to electric using a front hub motor.

Peter VanDerWal
Well, it IS a motorcycle.

Are you in the USA?  If so, then this bicycle isn't legal on the roads
unless it's licensed as either a motorcycle or a moped and your son would
need to have the appropriate license to drive it.

FWIW people get hurt EVERY DAY riding unassisted bicycles. Two wheeled
vehicle are inherently unstable and depend on the rider to keep them from
falling over.  Crashes that don't involve another vehicle are almost alway
caused by "pilot error"

> Please use all caution and safety equip. when riding these kind of
> bikes. My son is currently recovering
> from two broken elbows after a crash on his hub motor propelled bike.
> It will go 25 mph and
> should be thought of like a "motor"cycle (which it is), instead of
> like a bicycle.
> Regards,
> Tom Brannan
>
> On Sun, May 11, 2008 at 3:52 AM, richarddthomas
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Hi Folks have been riding my recumbent Bike-E for a year now with a 36
>> volt
>> motorized kit from a company called Electrik Motion which includes all
>> the
>> components you described. I paid $499.00 for the kit. I live in  hilly
>> Connecticut, USA. An average ride for me is 20 -25 miles and  am left
>> with
>> plenty of juice left after each ride. The bike will do 15 miles per hour
>> on
>> the motor alone (without peddling)on a flat road for 12 miles. I use the
>> motor sparingly, only for assist on the big hills. This not only extends
>> my
>> range, but allows a more even ride as far as exertion goes ,which puts
>> me in
>> more control of my own escercise and I get to be out on th elocal bike,
>> rail
>> trails in the fresh air almost daily. I have just passed the 30000 mile
>> mark
>> on my odometer.
>> Richard Thomas
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "paul holmes" <[hidden email]>
>> To: <[hidden email]>
>> Sent: Monday, May 05, 2008 12:55 PM
>> Subject: [EVDL] Converting a bike to electric using a front hub motor.
>>
>>
>>>
>>> You are going to love how easy it is. I bought a Crystalyte brushed DC
>>> hub
>>> motor already built into a front wheel (no tire though).  Also, buy a
>>> brushed DC 36/48v 20amp or 35amp motor controller.  Next, buy some
>>> cheapo
>>> 7
>>> amp-hr batteries, and wire them in series, to either 36 or 48v.  I
>>> bought
>>> 8
>>> of them, so that altogether, I have 48v 14amp-hrs.  You need some sort
>>> of
>>> back rack on the bike that you can buy at a bike shop to set your
>>> batteries
>>> on.  Also, buy a little on/off switch from home depot.  connect it to
>>> one
>>> of
>>> the leads to your battery pack, for easy shutoff of power when you want
>>> to.
>>> Finally, attach 30 amp Anderson connectors to the leads of the battery
>>> pack
>>> (after the switch) so you can plug the pack into the controller.  Mount
>>> the
>>> controller where ever you want.  (I just used a bunch of electrical
>>> tape).
>>>
>>> BattPackNeg------------------------------------AndersonConnector
>>> BattPackPlus---------ON/OFFSwitch-------------AndersonConnector
>>>
>>> Anderson connectors come pre-installed on the leads for the motor
>>> controller, and for the motor, so the rest you just plug in.
>>> To charge the battery pack, just disconnect from the controller (make
>>> sure
>>> ON/OFF is set to ON) and plug it into the charger first, then plug the
>>> charger into the wall.
>>>
>>>
>>> I used "ebikes.ca".  They were very helpful, and it's pretty reasonable
>>> prices.
>>> For batteries, I got them on Ebay from the following guy.  They have
>>> worked
>>> great for 6 months so far, charging and discharging them EVERY DAY:
>>>
>>> http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=260236362581&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT&ih=016
>>> Ebay 7 amp-hr Lead Acid Batteries
>>>
>>>
>>> dave cover-2 wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Paul
>>>>
>>>> Can you give some details of the bike and the components you used. I'm
>>>> looking to do the same. I already have a donor, but I don't know
>>>> anything
>>>> about bike conversions.
>>>>
>>>> Dave Cover
>>>>
>>>> On Sun, May 4, 2008 at 9:48 PM, paul holmes <[hidden email]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>    About a year ago, I converted an old mountain bike to electric.
>>>>> Lacey,
>>>>> my home town, was having an energy fair this last Saturday, so I
>>>>> called
>>>>> up
>>>>> city hall to find out if I could have a booth to display it.  The day
>>>>> started really rainy, but there were still a good number of people.
>>>>> I
>>>>> had
>>>>> a
>>>>> nice display on a cardboard backing (my wife put it together) that
>>>>> was
>>>>> getting soaked (I wasn't very prepared), and a fellow ev-er lent me a
>>>>> big
>>>>> tent.
>>>>>    I bet I talked to about 100 people in-depth about how the bike
>>>>> works,
>>>>> the cost, how to assemble the lead acid pack, etc.  Almost none of
>>>>> them
>>>>> had
>>>>> ever seen an electric bike.  They loved the simplicity of the front
>>>>> hub
>>>>> motor.  Plus, my setup was cheap, so I got to tell them that it can
>>>>> be
>>>>> done
>>>>> for $300-350.  People ranging in ages from 10 to 80 (not joking!)
>>>>> took
>>>>> turns
>>>>> riding the e-bike all around Huntamer Park.  Most came back with that
>>>>> famous
>>>>> EV grin (it can happen even from e-bikes!!).  These people were
>>>>> hungry
>>>>> for
>>>>> alternatives for their transportation.  It was really exciting to
>>>>> see!
>>>>> Lee's tipping point isn't here yet, but if we get out there and show
>>>>> our
>>>>> stuff, people are perhaps more willing to listen now than ever
>>>>> before.
>>>>> --
>>>>> View this message in context:
>>>>> http://www.nabble.com/Lacey%2C-WA-Alternative-Energy-Fair-Success-Despite-Rain-tp17053549p17053549.html
>>>>> Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive
>>>>> at
>>>>> Nabble.com.
>>>>>
>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>> For subscription options, see
>>>>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>>>>
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> For subscription options, see
>>>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> View this message in context:
>>> http://www.nabble.com/Lacey%2C-WA-Alternative-Energy-Fair-Success-Despite-Rain-tp17053549p17066031.html
>>> Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at
>>> Nabble.com.
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> For subscription options, see
>>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> For subscription options, see
>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>
>
>
>
> --
> There's more than one way to smoke a 'possum...
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>


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Re: Converting a bike to electric using a front hub motor.

Frank John
In reply to this post by MPaulHolmes
Actually, it seems that bicycle requirements depend on where you live.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_bicycle_laws#Connecticut  Licensing is not necessarily required.  

It's fairly easy to hit 25 mph on a regular bicycle so electric assist really doesn't have that much to do with it.  An issue to be aware of is that e-bikes are heavier than regular bicycles (for example a heavier front hub can effect the steering response.)  I do think it's a bit of an exaggeration to state that two wheeled vehicles are inherently unstable, although like most activities, operator skill is obviously a factor in the outcome.



----- Original Message ----
From: Peter VanDerWal <[hidden email]>
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <[hidden email]>
Sent: Friday, May 16, 2008 9:07:19 AM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Converting a bike to electric using a front hub motor.

Well, it IS a motorcycle.

Are you in the USA?  If so, then this bicycle isn't legal on the roads
unless it's licensed as either a motorcycle or a moped and your son would
need to have the appropriate license to drive it.

FWIW people get hurt EVERY DAY riding unassisted bicycles. Two wheeled
vehicle are inherently unstable and depend on the rider to keep them from
falling over.  Crashes that don't involve another vehicle are almost alway
caused by "pilot error"


     
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Re: Converting a bike to electric using a front hub motor.

Roger Stockton
Frank John wrote:

> Actually, it seems that bicycle requirements depend on where
> you live.
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_bicycle_laws#Connecticut
>   Licensing is not necessarily required.
>
> It's fairly easy to hit 25 mph on a regular bicycle so
> electric assist really doesn't have that much to do with it.

A recurring theme on this page is that electric-assist bicycles are commonly required to have a maximum speed of 20mph without pedalling.

> An issue to be aware of is that e-bikes are heavier than
> regular bicycles (for example a heavier front hub can effect
> the steering response.)  I do think it's a bit of an
> exaggeration to state that two wheeled vehicles are
> inherently unstable, although like most activities, operator
> skill is obviously a factor in the outcome.

It is true that two-wheeled vehicles are inherently unstable; try letting go of your bike and see how long it remains upright on its own ;^>

That said, I suspect the stability of a two-wheeler has little to do with the unfortunate situation of the boy with two broken elbows (my condolences to the original poster, by the way).

Limiting the assist to a maximum of 20mph can help avoid such accidents.  I personally believe it to be safer to power the rear wheel than the front, though it may not have been a factor in this case.  Use of a motor controller that kills power when the brakes are applied can also enhance safety, as can use of a controller that only allows the electric assist to be active when the operator provides a minimum amount of pedal assist (in a panic situation the operator is almost certain to stop pedalling even if they freeze and don't apply the brakes or release the throttle).

The difference with un-motorised bicyles is that even though they can be operated in excess of 20mph, this usually requires a fairly deliberate effort by the operator and they tend to slow down on their own if the operator stops pedalling.

Cheers,

Roger.

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Re: Converting a bike to electric using a front hub motor.

Zeke Yewdall
In reply to this post by Frank John
On Fri, May 16, 2008 at 4:02 PM, Frank John <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> It's fairly easy to hit 25 mph on a regular bicycle so electric assist
> really doesn't have that much to do with it.


Lance Armstrong can keep up 40mph on his....   I'm doing good to keep and
average of 15 though... :)

Z
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