MAXIMUM VOLTAGE: Curtis 1238-6501

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MAXIMUM VOLTAGE: Curtis 1238-6501

Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
Hello

What is the maximum voltage of a Curtis 1238-6501 controller?

EVWest is telling me 75 volts, but I have heard 108volts?

Thanks

Michael
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Re: MAXIMUM VOLTAGE: Curtis 1238-6501

Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
The 1238-6501 uses 48 to 80 volts DC (nominal). The voltage of the pack will likely be a bit higher than the nominal rating.
As an example, a 48 volt (nominal) lead acid pack might have a fully charged resting voltage around 52.5 volts, and similar 72 volt pack would have a resting voltage just under 80 volts. If someone made up an 80 volt pack, the resting voltage would be about 88 volts or so.

That being said, what is more important is the highest voltage expected on the system. This will happen when the battery pack is being charged. The maximum voltage on a 72 volt pack while finishing a charge is about 92 to 96 volts, or about 100 to 104 volts on an 80 volt lead acid system. These are approximate numbers. (finishing/equalizing voltage varies by battery manufacturer, and occasionally by charger programming facility).

The highest potential charging voltage for an 80 volt nominal system is close to the 108 volt number you have - I would consider that to be an absolute maximum voltage that is encountered on rare occasions.

Anything higher than an '80 volt' pack risks popping this controller. Staying with 72 volts max (nominal) will give you a good safety margin and longer controller life.

Tom Keenan

> On Feb 20, 2017, at 10:17 AM, m gol via EV <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Hello
>
> What is the maximum voltage of a Curtis 1238-6501 controller?
>
> EVWest is telling me 75 volts, but I have heard 108volts?
>
> Thanks
>
> Michael

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Re: MAXIMUM VOLTAGE: Curtis 1238-6501

Cruisin
We used 100's of those controllers on 96vdc Li-ion systems with excellent results. You will not have any re generation if the voltage goes in excess of 105vdc. Best to do a factory reset on the controller and re program to avoid any problems. The factory OS software is available to perform that function.
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Re: MAXIMUM VOLTAGE: Curtis 1238-6501

Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
In reply to this post by Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
Hi Michael,

  Just as Tom says, the 1238-6501 Curtis controller is designed for 80V
nominal voltage systems.  I did the mistake to order this controller for a
32 lithium cells 3.2V x cel, 102.4V nominal and realized too late when I
tryed to run the system on a just fully charged pack. I noticed the
'pre-programmed' high voltage cutoff from HPEVs software was 105.1Volts
altough the internal caps can support little higer.

  I would not recommend to go to the factory OS if it comes from HPEVs with
the motor as a kit. Especially if you have latest firmware versions. HPEVs
firmware version has lot more performance than Curtis OEM version.

Marco Gaxiola
EnergyEV.com


On Mon, Feb 20, 2017 at 1:35 PM, Tom Keenan via EV <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> The 1238-6501 uses 48 to 80 volts DC (nominal). The voltage of the pack
> will likely be a bit higher than the nominal rating.
> As an example, a 48 volt (nominal) lead acid pack might have a fully
> charged resting voltage around 52.5 volts, and similar 72 volt pack would
> have a resting voltage just under 80 volts. If someone made up an 80 volt
> pack, the resting voltage would be about 88 volts or so.
>
> That being said, what is more important is the highest voltage expected on
> the system. This will happen when the battery pack is being charged. The
> maximum voltage on a 72 volt pack while finishing a charge is about 92 to
> 96 volts, or about 100 to 104 volts on an 80 volt lead acid system. These
> are approximate numbers. (finishing/equalizing voltage varies by battery
> manufacturer, and occasionally by charger programming facility).
>
> The highest potential charging voltage for an 80 volt nominal system is
> close to the 108 volt number you have - I would consider that to be an
> absolute maximum voltage that is encountered on rare occasions.
>
> Anything higher than an '80 volt' pack risks popping this controller.
> Staying with 72 volts max (nominal) will give you a good safety margin and
> longer controller life.
>
> Tom Keenan
>
> > On Feb 20, 2017, at 10:17 AM, m gol via EV <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > Hello
> >
> > What is the maximum voltage of a Curtis 1238-6501 controller?
> >
> > EVWest is telling me 75 volts, but I have heard 108volts?
> >
> > Thanks
> >
> > Michael
>
> _______________________________________________
> UNSUBSCRIBE: http://www.evdl.org/help/index.html#usub
> http://lists.evdl.org/listinfo.cgi/ev-evdl.org
> Read EVAngel's EV News at http://evdl.org/evln/
> Please discuss EV drag racing at NEDRA (http://groups.yahoo.com/
> group/NEDRA)
>
>
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80VDC is MAXIMUM VOLTAGE: Curtis 1238-6501

brucedp5
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list
[Qualifier: I am not an EV builder. I have only enjoyed driving the work of those that do.]

Engineers designing a product have a long-life, reliability goal when they release specs.
If you dink or tinker around with what a product can do, you will find what it can not (letting the over heated smoke out, a fire, or it just stops working like the old filament light bulb).

IMO, I would NOT push past a product's specs. I also strongly suggest you have the correct amount of heat dissipation cooling (i.e.: the right size heat sink), for its use, and adjust that amount upward if you are in the hotter areas of the world.

Both of the following manual .pdf 's say to not connect it to a higher than 80VDC pack:

http://curtisinstruments.com/Uploads/DataSheets/50265_123638E_RevC3.pdf
Models 1236 and 1238  50265 REV C 3/16
(page 4 of 8
model ---- packV 2minA 1hourA
1238E-65XX 48–80 500 190
)


http://www.thunderstruck-ev.com/Manuals/1234_36_38%20Manual%20Rev%20Feb%2009.pdf
1234/36/38 Manual, p/n 37022  17 February 2009   Software version OS 11.0
(page 133 of 134
model ---- packV 2minA 1hourA
1238-65XX 48–80 550 155
)

If you do decide to push your pack voltage, remember that additional voltage and or current beyond a product's design equates to additional power (Watts) being dissipated on its internal components (if it feels hot on the heat sink connection, it is really hot at the internal component connection, etc.).
*Thus be sure to add much more heat sinking and cooling (more metal, and add cooling fans, etc.) to your EV design configuration.


IMO any wild/out-of-design-spec claims you read on-line, should be suspected for their posted purpose (to increase sales from its author). Also, look at the date of the post (old posts may no longer be valid).
I found one that referenced to a seller's claims, see
http://www.diyelectriccar.com/forums/showpost.php?p=369814&postcount=13

I recommend you stick with manufacturer's design specifications, for a reliable EV with a long-life.




For EVLN EV-newswire posts use:
http://evdl.org/evln/


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